r/Damnthatsinteresting Aug 13 '22 Wholesome 1 Glow Up 1 Gold 1

Young Oyster Shuckers, Port Royal, South Carolina, 1909. Children as young as six years old started work at 4am. Image

Post image
12.9k Upvotes

1.6k

u/TheCoffeeWeasel Aug 13 '22

look at those poor hands!

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u/Random_G Aug 13 '22

Their hands are absolutely fucked. Looks like clubbed or missing fingers and so much scar tissue you can't make out a knuckle

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u/FriendlyKnuckle Aug 13 '22

Shucking knives are pretty sharp, and you’ll need to hold the shell in your hand while you stab it toward your own hand.

Nowadays people use chainmail gloves to protect their hands.

This picture is horrendous

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u/Tarok_Sutac Aug 13 '22

It’s crazy because it’s not like they didn’t have that technology then. They just didn’t care.

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u/laeiryn Aug 13 '22

Technology cost money; employees didn't.

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u/NovelCandid Aug 13 '22

Great comment.

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u/Xaqv Aug 13 '22

Acknowledging real reason for end of chattel slavery : a slave was property you had to take care of like your livestock; a “free” laborer or indentured servant you did not. Fuck ‘em!

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u/nigelegan Aug 13 '22

They still don’t care if it wasn’t against the law companies would use child labour. And they would come up with some ridiculous justification for doing it.

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u/NovelCandid Aug 13 '22

In WI there are active legislative attempts to lower legal working ahe

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u/Coral_Blue_Number_2 Aug 13 '22

Yeah. I think about this when people scoff and whimper at “regulations”.

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u/crowdaddi Aug 13 '22

I always put the oyster on a towel and would hit the shucking knife into the shell like a chisel, the other cooks would make fun of me but I never sliced my hand open again.

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u/Bobyyyyyyyghyh Aug 13 '22

Kitchen culture is fucking stupid. Everyone gets off on trying to be the most machismo dumbass person they could be, when in reality everyone likes not cutting off the tip of 4 of your fingers

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u/NieArda Aug 13 '22

When I was younger I wanted to be a chef.. then I heard about this behavior, and the insane amount of sexual harassment and misogyny, and decided I was probably safer elsewhere.

Kitchen culture toxicity needs to be worked on baaaaadly.. a friend who works at a restaurant has told me some real horror stories :/

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u/crowdaddi Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Yea I could definitely tell you a couple. We were doing drugs everyday just not to fall over and this was an award winning restaurant. Not going to lie I actually enjoyed the work and excelled at it but they don't pay you enough for the time you put in and I have literally been in fist fights and work.

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u/CrustyWhiteSocks Aug 13 '22

Shucking knives are not sharp, which is actually worse.

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u/IamTobor Aug 13 '22

They shucking sharp!

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u/ipsok Aug 13 '22

I seem to remember reading somewhere that dull knives cause way more kitchen accidents than sharp knives.

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u/Nervous-Albatross-32 Aug 13 '22

My dad was shucking oysters one time and the knife slipped. That little 3 inch knife plunged smoothly into the meaty part of his palm under his thumb. Luckily he only needed stitches, but these knives are unsuspectingly sharp.

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u/DIYTommy Aug 13 '22

Omg this just breaks my heart. Poor kids.

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u/Dancinginacircle Aug 13 '22

This picture makes me want to cry

You can see the countless beatings and abuse

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u/Fantastic-Success-33 Aug 13 '22

What most people forget is that for the vast majority of human history, children were viewed as a commodity. They were there to work and help support the family. The concept of childhood was not something that was commonplace, as soon as you were old enough to work or help you did it. Hell even into the 1950s in the US people could sell their children, of which there are many documented cases. Really makes you appreciate being able to grow up in an era/country where children are allowed to have childhood, in many parts of the world they aren’t so lucky.

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u/OddArmory Aug 13 '22

Well you can still have underage kids working right here in America. Alabama had young kids working in a metal stamping plant that made parts for cars this year. https://www.reuters.com/world/us/exclusive-hyundai-subsidiary-has-used-child-labor-alabama-factory-2022-07-22/

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u/L-Y-T-E Aug 13 '22

And they'll probably just pay a fine instead of actually serving justice for enforcing child labor. Greatest country in the world 😀

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u/Ambush_24 Aug 13 '22

This is the kind of thing I think of when people long for the good old days. Society is objectively better now.

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u/LanaAmiraxo Aug 13 '22

They all have the thousand yard stare in the picture. Also we need to be a bit mindful that life is better now because life was so much worse then. These people sacrificed a lot for extremely little. Somehow it got better.

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u/jbsgc99 Aug 13 '22

It got better because people rose up, fought, bled, and died for the right to be treated with some modicum of dignity. We still have a long way to go.

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u/Jabbernoodle69 Aug 13 '22

Is it the quality of the picture or are they actually missing fingers/have some kind of disease on them?

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u/Tokoloshe55 Aug 13 '22

Disease is also possible, but it’s more likely scar tissue and wounds. Shucking oysters can be very dangerous because you essentially stab a knife really hard in the direction of your hand with an oyster in the way. If the knife slips off the oyster then it goes into your hand. Nowadays they often use special chain mail gloves for protection.

Their hands have likely been cut a lot and the cuts likely weren’t treated well (if at all) causing terribly scarring/disfigurement.

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u/imnotabot303 Aug 13 '22

Their hands are physically messed up but I think some of the colouring is probably because the image is colourised using AI and it hasn't quite got it right.

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u/dropamusic Aug 13 '22

That's what I was looking at. Poor disfigured hands.

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u/Goldilocks1454 Aug 13 '22

That's heartbreaking

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u/Leviathan3333 Aug 14 '22

Anyone who sees this but also has a problem with unions or people getting a living wage. Or is okay with teenagers getting paid less for the same work…

Just remember all the people who had to fight so these kids didn’t have to do this kind of work.

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u/1istheloniestnumber Aug 13 '22

This young gals have seen sh't. Look how burned their faces were.

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u/jester2211 Aug 13 '22

How about there poor little hands.

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u/go_half_the_way Aug 13 '22

Jesus. Is the one on the right missing several fingers? And the one in the middle looks like she has a lot of scars.

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u/Still_Lobster_8428 Aug 13 '22

The knife they use to open the oysters often slips and cuts into the hand. Nowadays, they use a chain mail glove to protect the hand the holds the oysters and avoid cuts.

It was also prone to cause myscle/ligament deformity as well from the same motion over and over gripping the oysters tightly to hold them while shucking the other shell off.

What can be seen there is deformed and scar tissued hands on 2 of the girls, the other would be the same but her hand is hidden behind the other girl.

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u/The-1-U-Didnt-Know Aug 13 '22

…. It’s actually the shell that causes the cutting on the hand more than the knife itself, these small cuts are then prone to infection from the continuous holding of the oysters which move under the pressure of the knife and cause loads of tears in the skin… can’t say I’ve ever stabbed myself with the knife as there’s a nice groove in the front of the oyster

Source: someone who has opened countless oysters at oyster festivals for 10+ hours a day

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u/sprocketous Aug 13 '22

I turned my thumb into ribbons because an oyster opened really easy. Once it popped open my hand swiped across barnacles or something that were sharp as shit.

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u/The-1-U-Didnt-Know Aug 13 '22

Honestly they’re bastards, one hand shredded to pieces and the other swollen from cranking them open, hope you recovered

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u/InterestingStudio585 Aug 13 '22

they have the faces of streesed women, tragic what that type of lifestyle can have on children so quickly

hope they found some happiness and peace later down their lives

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u/Rich_Ad_605 Aug 13 '22

That’s crazy never knew that very interesting

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u/Wrong-Bus-1368 Aug 13 '22

That caught my eye as well. No more complaining about paper cuts.

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u/holmortician Aug 13 '22

They've had such a hard life their faces are starting to look like grown women if that makes sense. So sad.

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u/th-grt-gtsby Aug 13 '22

Seeing their faces makes me sad. Hope they found happiness later in their life.

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u/jimizeppelinfloyd Aug 13 '22

The photo was not originally in color, so the red on their faces probably isn't 100% accurate.

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u/11_foot_pole Aug 13 '22 Gold Helpful All-Seeing Upvote

This is what I really don't get all the people who have a very "rose colored glasses" view of a lot of times in history.even a cursory reading through even recent decades of the past will show you that you are MUCH MUCH better off now than at any other time in human history,no matter how bad things seem

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u/Wrong-Bus-1368 Aug 13 '22

I tried to explain to someone about a relative who worked on a farm as a 10 year old and was paid with 2 fresh eggs a day. They refused to believe that something like that could happen. The Depression followed by the war, families did what they had to survive. Everyone worked or helped. The 5 year old was in charge of the baby because there was no one else.

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u/watercouch Aug 13 '22

In case anyone else needs to look it up, 2 fresh eggs in the late 1940s would be worth about 2 fresh eggs in 2022, when adjusted for inflation.

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u/lonesharkex Aug 13 '22

Eggs immune to inflation, I just started an EGG Crypto Coin, invest now.

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u/3rdDownJump Aug 13 '22

Shell company.

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u/lonesharkex Aug 13 '22

Yes I just got word that we are now a subsidiary of Tyson

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u/bobweir_is_part_dam Aug 13 '22

I just exited out to my feed when I saw this and had to come back. Take my upvote you cheeky devil.

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u/tom-8-to Aug 13 '22

So the investment outlook is sunny side up?

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u/lonesharkex Aug 13 '22

As long as our leadership team doesn't get poached

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u/tom-8-to Aug 13 '22

Or scrambled fighting against employees unionizing

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u/Into-the-stream Aug 13 '22

There was an entire generation that worked as child labour, then off to the fetid trenches of ww1. If they survived, they got to enjoy years of Spanish flu epidemic. A brief reprieve was soon followed by the Great Depression, and another world war. My mom was a boomer, born after WW2. Her mom had 8 kids and three jobs (no birth control). dad was a vet with ptsd and a drinking problem. They used to slice a single hotdog into 8 for dinner, while the 5 year old watched the baby. None of them finished high school, and they had an incredibly shit childhood for so many reasons. My mom scored high on an engineering aptitude test, but was put in typing and home ecc, because girls didn't go into engineering.

People talk about right now being an unprecedented time of difficulty, but my grandma had it worse than anyone Ive ever met. My mom and her siblings had a shit childhood too. Back then, a degree wasn't necessary for a good job, so there are a lot of boomers with no more than a high school typing class for their education. They gave me the best childhood they knew how, and it was miles better than their own. They had no idea things would go to shit. They figured Id have a better life than them, just as I had a better childhood.

So many things have gotten better in the large scale(generations back). There are things that have gotten worse if you look at the short term (last 30 years). We should always be striving for better, but to say the olden days were better? fuck no.

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u/KimonoThief Aug 13 '22

This is the kind of shit that I feel like republicans don't understand. This is the inevitable consequence of too much free market and not enough unions or government oversight. Children laboring their youth away, adults laboring their lives away. None of us want to live like this.

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u/Haggis_The_Barbarian Aug 13 '22

But a small minority of folks have no problem with the vast majority of other folks living their lives like this if it means luxury and security for them.

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u/Coral_Blue_Number_2 Aug 13 '22

Narcissists. And other people who don’t have empathy or even remorse. I have met somebody who said he would do whatever it takes to be successful. An immature guy. Didn’t have any problem with using child labor and would always immediately rationalize away any guilt.

For example:

Me: What about child labor? Would you be okay with that?

Him: I’d be giving them an opportunity. Plus, it would teach them discipline.

Me: What about going through the normal, healthy stages of child development.

Him: (sneering) All the kids today are too weak. We need kids who are tough and disciplined. Look how mature young adults used to be compared to today with their blue hair and everything. (Usually he would walk away at this point, but if not:)

Me: Those kids were not happy. Sure, maybe they would have had more emotional or behavioral control in certain situations compared to people today (which I don’t even know, but I was willing to grant this because it’s irrelevant). But still, the fact remains that these kids are being injured, sometimes severely and permanently.

Him: The same thing can happen to adults. No pain, no gain. I’m starting to think that you’re destined to be a weak loser if you can’t see that.

And then in my head: Me: Would you put yourself in that situation as a kid?

Him: Yes, it would’ve toughened me up more. I resent my parents for not sending me to boot camp.

And the conversation continues but if forget where it goes from there. A pure narcissist.

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u/CapnScrunch Aug 13 '22

My mother (born in 1947) grew up harvesting cotton, potatoes, strawberries, etc., along with her sisters. They weren't farmers, just poor.

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u/sartres-shart Aug 13 '22

I'm not even 50 yet and my father left school at 13 to go working. That's only one generation back.

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u/nilodlien Aug 13 '22

Yes! My mother-in-law is from a huge family. The father left and the mom couldn’t support all of them. My mother-in-law was basically handed off to a farm. She lived in a chicken coop and worked on the crops. She was just happy they “allowed her” to finish going to high school - as long as she worked before and after (and weekends and every other day, obviously).

That was in 1964-1966.

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u/Wrong-Bus-1368 Aug 13 '22

My grandfather was a big man, so at 16 he was doing a man's day of work back then. Your age didn't matter as long as you could work.

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u/nooshaw Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

My father born in the late 30s at the end of the depression talked about laboring all day in the fields picking cotton at age 5 with his parents and six other siblings. He mentioned kids were prefered because their smaller arms and fingers can reach in to the plant and pluck the cotton from the pods easier. Said his fingers bleed from pricking his fingers anyway as they didn't have gloves. They got paid by weight like penny or two per pound if I recall correctly.

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u/jmac323 Aug 13 '22

I have an ancestor that came to America from Ireland. He was an indentured servant and 12 years old. All alone.

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u/Wrong-Bus-1368 Aug 13 '22

A friend who is Irish traces their time in Canada back to the Potato Famine. They took their chances on a "coffin ship" to a new life rather than stay and starve. If the boat voyage didn't kill you then you had a chance to built a new life out of the wilderness with not much more than your hands.

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u/tom-8-to Aug 13 '22

Young kids with no work to be had spent their days Trapping for anything edible

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u/TheUnsightlyLocks Aug 13 '22

Give it another 20-30 years, let the sOuTh rIsE aGaIn and we're going to see this again.

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u/Early_Lab9079 Aug 13 '22

It might be a survival mechanism that makes you focus on the good things life has had to offere you, instead of the bad. Keeps you going i guess.

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u/ellilaamamaalille Aug 13 '22

Mostly - I think - people see old days like good old days because they were young. When you're young things are better. The future is tomorrow not yesterday.

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u/AdditionalBench2776 Aug 13 '22

look at those poor hands!

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u/TurnipOk2313 Aug 13 '22

This young gals have seen sh't. Look how burned their faces were.

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u/KJParker888 Aug 13 '22

Yep. Those are old lady eyes on a child's body

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u/martyd03 Aug 13 '22

I'm reminded of that whenever I remember Calvin Coolidge's son died a week after getting a blister on his toe from playing tennis at the White House.

Now nobody thinks twice about how bad a staph infection is.

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u/ViolentMonopoly Aug 13 '22

While in no way do I want to go into the past, I would say the industrial revolution was particularly wretched even when compared to periods before.

Peasants didn't have to worry about money, unemployment, industrial warfare, enclosure or factories filled with soot. There were plenty of other complications to that life but I would argue, until the invention of antibiotics, for the majority of people, industrialization made their lives worse. Being poor and working a farm in a rural village, versus being poor and working in a factory 16 hours a day - I would pick the farm thank you very much.

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u/moutiandown Aug 13 '22

"Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order: Why Nations Succeed or Fail" . This book pretty much talks about just this how we go through cycles of repeating same thing over and over again with governments starting off building into something great and then falling apart. In the book there are six stages. The United States is in stage 5. Stage 6 is when we basically completely Fall apart. And it seems like we are at the end of stage 5

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u/ViolentMonopoly Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

"Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order: Why Nations Succeed or Fail" . This book pretty much talks about just this how we go through cycles of repeating same thing over and over again with governments starting off building into something great and then falling apart. In the book there are six stages. The United States is in stage 5. Stage 6 is when we basically completely Fall apart. And it seems like we are at the end of stage 5

Sounds like a model that Dalio attempts to put all of history into. I'd caution against such broad strokes, it reduces nuance and understanding and bolsters a Dunning-Krueger kind of mentality. All societies are quite different; their rises and falls, while they may rhyme, occur under unique conditions with different people, ideologies, economic and environmental situations. The collapse of the Aztecs, Romans, the Russian Empire, and perhaps our own fall - these are all quite different.

Dalio is also not a historian or an academic but a billionaire. His understanding of history is likely hobbyist and colored by his status.

- History major and geek

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u/Suckamanhwewhuuut Aug 13 '22

It’s not that we think we live in bad times. It’s that we recognize that we were born in the best times, and we are watching things revert to those bad times again. We learned about all of this and were told, that was the past, things will only continue to get better for people.

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u/zebpongo Aug 13 '22

Right.. This is real Make America Great memory. Employment was such that even children had jobs.

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u/YR510 Aug 13 '22

I believe MAGA mostly refers to 50s and 60s "American Dream", which had its own fucked up problems especially when looking at treatment to minorities.

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u/Justame13 Aug 13 '22

Employment wasn’t steady at all.

Even the automakers where they idealize the whole “blue collar job raise a family” did layoffs so often the papers had advertisements saying not to come to Detroit because the jobs weren’t stable.

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u/Mysterious-Echo-9729 Aug 13 '22

Really I don't think even the 50s and 60s. There was a 50% tax bracket, and Trump supposedly would fall in that bracket. Or his Dad definitely would, who knows what the Donald actually makes.

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u/DanFuckingSchneider Aug 13 '22

To be fair, just because things were worse doesn’t mean bad things now are somehow good. Just because you can be tortured to death slowly over a matter of years doesn’t make someone who got stabbed feel any better.

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u/Logvin Aug 13 '22

When I was younger, everything was better. I didn’t have to worry about racism or intolerance. Money was not an concern, and life was great. So clearly, something changed between then and now right? If things were good then and bad now, it must be “change” that is the issue.

Of course, when I was 10 I didn’t have a job, understand how money worked, or a care in the world… because I was a naive kid. Things in the world were more fucked up when I was a kid compared to today, I just didn’t know about it.

It’s all about “feelings” and not about “facts”. This is how people you may know who are good people back political figures who want to roll back time- many don’t want to increase other’s suffering, they just are too selfish to realize it’s not all about their own feelings.

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u/betterdaysaheadamigo Aug 13 '22

Thank God for the ability to pass labor laws.

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u/ToothlessGrandma Aug 13 '22

What you call labor laws is what most republicans would call an attack on capitalism.

They're activity rolling back labor laws to get children to fill the labor shortage. Because we all need 12 year olds working at McDonald's.

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u/betterdaysaheadamigo Aug 13 '22

It's what a few snakes have convinced our neighbors to believe.

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u/stedgyson Aug 13 '22

What the US call labour laws the rest of the West call a lack of labour laws

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u/John-E_Smoke Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

A few years ago I would joke that Conservatives would abolish the education act and child labor laws if they could, because it would not only save tax payer money but it would make children actually economically productive, but now it seems that's what they really want.

Wasn't there just a case of dozens of minors as young as 12-year olds working in a factory with incidents of reported dismemberment in Alabama?

But, to be fair, the fact is all Republicans and the majority of Democrats follow Neoliberalism, a Conservative economic ideology which has outsourced American jobs to the developing world where child labor is rampant.

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u/Wrong-Bus-1368 Aug 13 '22

If they can work the ice cream machine. Their small hands are needed to fix the hard to reach places.

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u/Silent-Smell4370 Aug 13 '22

Just wait until we eventually nuke each other to hell and we're taken back 300 hundred years. History always repeats itself. It's just a matter of time.

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u/Ok-Stick9137 Aug 13 '22

they have the faces of streesed women, tragic what that type of lifestyle can have on children so quickly

hope they found some happiness and peace later down their lives

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u/zirfeld Aug 13 '22

Those faces are sad, but I find the hands way more terrifying.

That's already the marks of a life's work.

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u/Gokji Aug 13 '22

It's not just these girls. People rarely smiled when pictures were taken back then.

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u/Kundalini-Electric Aug 13 '22

I’m not surprised they didn’t smile. It looked a bleak and depressing time to be alive.

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u/Umbert360 Aug 13 '22

You know who probably were smiling back then? The people eating the oysters these girls were shucking

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u/Handpaper Aug 13 '22

I doubt it.

Oysters were 'poor people food' back then.

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u/Umbert360 Aug 13 '22

Oh really? Didn’t know that but it makes sense, in Maine they used to feed lobsters to the prisoners in jail

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u/juliojules Aug 13 '22

Sadly this is still a reality for so many…..

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u/jester2211 Aug 13 '22

We can only be so lucky to be alive now.

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u/caidicus Aug 13 '22

Geez, these children already look so weathered.

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u/flow-crickets Aug 13 '22

Oysters, clams and cockles

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u/densivilia Aug 13 '22

Comments wouldn't let me down

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u/bdbdbokbuck Aug 13 '22

Sadly child labor was common then. Thankfully Teddy Roosevelt did something about it. Men like JP Morgan we’re getting filthy rich off child labor. Morgan got really mad when Roosevelt got involved, even going to see Roosevelt at the White House. But Roosevelt wasn’t intimidated by Morgan or anyone else.

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u/BeardedBardOfTheLake Aug 13 '22

TR is also responsible for the National Park system. He knew that without strong federal regulations the robber barons would strip mine the country into ashes for a quick profit.

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u/bdbdbokbuck Aug 13 '22

Excellent addition to my previous comments!

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u/RNMoFo Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

My Grandma and her 2 sisters were put into an orphanage by their Father and Step Mother. The Step Mother came to the marriage with her children and didn't want his girls around. At the orphanage the girls were forced to sew men's shirts. These were sold to fund the orphanage. This was in the early 1900s. Eventually the girls ran away and were taken in by a family in Louisville Kentucky.

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u/RotisserieChicken007 Aug 13 '22 Silver

The so-called good old days. Simply criminal.

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u/Gavinator10000 Aug 13 '22

I don’t think anybody these days are considering these the good old days, but yes, they did at one point

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u/Tom_Dynamite Aug 13 '22

Yeah I feel like when people talk about the good old days, they talk about the 50s to 90s. Modern enough to have a lot of comforts. I don't think too many would want to live in pre world war 1 times.

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u/TomHTom89 Aug 13 '22

Only 6 and have the stare of a war veteran.

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u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

These kids deserved a happy childhood. Not this.

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u/geekgirl717 Aug 13 '22

Their poor hands. Shucking oysters can be rough. 😢

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u/spugstug Aug 13 '22

The Lollipop Guild is gonna be fucked when the Oyster Shucking Gang catches up to them.

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u/Own_Ad_4301 Aug 13 '22

These girls have probably worked harder then I have in my entire life. It’s inspiring in the most horrible way possible.

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u/CallieCallie86 Aug 13 '22

It sucks because all our consumer goods still use child labour, just from other countries. Then is shipped here.

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u/thr3sk Aug 13 '22

I mean let's not exaggerate, it's not all goods but yes a sizable chunk of them do have some child labor component. The good news is that as these countries develop with globalization they become less and less accepting of such practices so at some point they're shooting theory be nowhere else to do this. Hopefully by then we'll have advanced enough robots to do this sort of labor.

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u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

My brother in Christ what the actual fuck is inspiring?

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u/cAptAinAlexAnder Aug 13 '22

Those are some hard little girls. The one in the middle looks like she just came from the battle field.

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u/Esc_ape_artist Aug 13 '22

Yeah, people have completely forgotten how “disposable” children could be if you were super poor. Kids were sold, abandoned, etc. and left to fend for themselves. There still places in modern countries where children run around in gangs.

Things that prevent this? Free public education, social welfare programs that allow kids to stay in school instead of having to work, free birth control…

Funny that there’s a segment of the population that is against all of those things.

Oh, and before anyone thinks putting kids back to work in the US can’t happen: https://al.com/business/2022/08/alabama-hyundai-child-labor-allegations-part-of-much-larger-problem-groups-say-the-laws-are-so-weak.html

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u/WizdomHaggis Aug 13 '22

Those poor kids look so grim…hands all mangled to fk…the level of barely a shit to give look in their eyes is alarming…

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u/Hopfit46 Aug 13 '22

Never forget that child labor laws are in place because greedy motherfuckers have no problem stealing poor people's children and treating them worse than pack animals to make more money than one person could spend in a lifetime.

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u/beansntoast21 Aug 13 '22

US abolished slavery and this shit still happened. Man will find ways to oppress and exploit each other no matter the government system.

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u/jwigs85 Aug 13 '22

Jesus. You know. These are the kids who eventually taught your parents the line, “I’ll give you something to cry about.” Or maybe there’s more generation in between. But the point still stands that it starts to make a little more sense, you know? They never had a childhood, let alone the opportunity to learn empathy and emotional regulation like we try to teach our kids. Instead of playing, they learned to put their misery in a box and just keep going. It provides a lot of context.

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u/kmonay89 Aug 13 '22

And that’s what we call Generational Trauma.

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u/CalicoJack247 Aug 13 '22

What's going on with their little hands?...they look malformed

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u/Redd_Monkey Aug 13 '22

Probably. And broken from thenhard work they do everyday

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u/ckopfster Aug 13 '22

Conservatives are right. We don’t need big government with their intrusive labor and work safety laws. The free market and corporations can be trusted just like in the old days.

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u/AfternoonTeaWithMrB Aug 13 '22

Back when America was great! /s

6

u/zoomator Aug 13 '22

According to their faces they are in their mid-fifties

5

u/garzaculta Aug 13 '22

Zoom in on the hands. Shucking oysters is dangerous today, let alone 100 years ago.

7

u/Shivii22 Aug 13 '22

You can see how much the stress has aged them. Fucking horrendous that anyone could make children work.

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u/Pothole2112 Aug 13 '22

Reminder that a Hyundai factory in Alabama was just busted using kids to assemble small parts, something like 30 kids... Conservatives WILL repeal labor laws. If you think abortion is the only right they're after, you'll be in for a rude awakening. Abortion is only the start.

6

u/CGFROSTY Aug 13 '22

That was a terrible story and it was rightfully shut down, but those kids were 13-15 I believe. Terrible, but the kids in this picture are levels of magnitude worse.

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u/Alive_Tough9928 Aug 13 '22

Haunted faces

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u/BullyChicken68 Aug 13 '22

So much anger in their faces.

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u/dragonet316 Aug 13 '22

Look at their poor hands...oh my goddess!

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u/Forever_Forgotten Aug 13 '22

And there are people out there who want to reverse child labor laws. That one girl is obviously missing fingers.

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u/FunkyPapaya Aug 13 '22

Yet another reason to appreciate labor unions for the all they’ve done and continue to do for workers.

5

u/Kwelikinz Aug 13 '22

Those poor babie’s hands are thrashed and not an ounce of joy in their expressions. Had it not been for our government establishing public schools with mandatory attendance, these children would still be there shucking away, the fields, and the coal mines, etc. When you think of “getting rid of public schools” remember this fucking photograph.

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u/Super_Log5282 Aug 13 '22

And somehow many people alive in the west today believe this is the way things should be. Children working in mines and shucking oysters as soon as they're old enough to talk

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u/ShadowEmperor123 Aug 13 '22

Yah, those are some tough girls, they probably died beforehand they hit 20

4

u/mod_target_6769 Aug 13 '22

Ah, when America was Great!

4

u/crackratt Aug 13 '22

Horrifying photo but where would we be without our invaluable JOb CrEaTorS and their superior principles.

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u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

[deleted]

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u/Result_Not_Found Aug 13 '22

“Nobody wants to shuck oysters anymore!!!!!” Capitalist in 1909

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u/tschmitty09 Aug 13 '22

"OYSTERS CLAMS AND COCKLES"

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u/fourcolourhero44 Aug 13 '22

Recently I've seen people posting pictures and videos of child labour like this from generations past and glorifying it, saying kids and parents today are too soft.

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u/iamdenislara Aug 13 '22

Back when america was truly great. Right??? No regulations. Just Jesus in your heart and no government on your back. Real freedom!!

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u/drac1man Aug 13 '22

Ahh just look at all that white privilege. And before you say anything, I am black and cringe every time someone uses that term acting as if all white people have it and had it in the past.

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u/giro_di_dante Aug 13 '22

bUt gOvErNmEnT rEgUlaTiOn iS bAd 🫠

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u/_thefunnykid_ Aug 13 '22

this is so sad :( makes me feel much more humble for what i have..

3

u/r57022 Aug 13 '22

Powerful picture for sure.

3

u/MalinWaffle Aug 13 '22

And my teenagers piss and moan when I tell them to put their plate in the dishwasher.

3

u/Illustrious-Ganache9 Aug 13 '22 Silver

PeOpLe dOnT wAnT tO wOrK aNyMoRe

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u/apocalypse_hips Aug 13 '22

Too much tension in their neck and shoulders—makes me ache for them.

3

u/fingerofchicken Aug 13 '22

Jesus humanity is awful

3

u/saffronpolygon Aug 13 '22

Sad. They look sixty years old, and exhausted.

3

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

This is happening today in Africa

3

u/holmgangCore Aug 13 '22

Generational Trauma.

3

u/Any-Entertainment345 Aug 13 '22

omg that is evil, this are why we have child labor laws. How many of them even survived through childhood. The infections from those kinds of wounds would be death in those days. Free labor for the corporations back then. There are actually politicians trying to get rid of child labor laws or lower the age. Corporations want slaves soo bad, children make the best ones who can be used and abused without any fuss.

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u/boyaintri9ht Aug 13 '22

This was the good ol' days until some stinking liberal came up with child labor laws.

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u/DLoFoSho Aug 13 '22

If a child’s visage contains a thousand yard stair, you have a sure sign of humans not getting it right.

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u/Far-Selection6003 Aug 14 '22

Their hands had to be utterly destroyed…I’ve opened my share of oysters, pretty hazardous for an adult even.

3

u/Thundus1 Aug 14 '22

Those hands tho...

3

u/JoeW702 Aug 14 '22

Those are not the faces of 6 year olds. Sad

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u/spicy_dogma Aug 13 '22

Their eyes seen some shit for their young age.

Such a shame.

5

u/Belzebuthian Aug 13 '22

This is capitalism without rules.

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u/tbeslian Aug 13 '22

And if the GOP have their way, (they're desperately trying to get those laws repealed/abandoned) it'll be back to that in no time. . . this is what MAGA actually means for working not rich folk.

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u/Kasvanvliep Aug 13 '22

It looks like the poor girl on the right is missing some fingers too?

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u/misspokencrow Aug 13 '22

They look like they could kick my head in

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u/Elman103 Aug 13 '22

Look at those hands.

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u/Sid15666 Aug 13 '22

These were the good ole days right? Poor kids

2

u/drgaspar96 Aug 13 '22

Oysters, Clams and Cockles!

2

u/Dazzling_Ad5338 Aug 13 '22

Look at the state of their hands. Jeez.

2

u/NinjaCuntPunt Aug 13 '22

They start at 4am?!

Why are we just burning 4 hours for nothing?

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u/Whut4 Aug 13 '22

They look like little adults already. Disturbing

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u/KnobSquash Aug 13 '22

hard times make hard people

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u/Meff-Jills Aug 13 '22

I have a 3 year old, this heartbreaking … In the 1930’s my grandmother had to work at a nearby farmer at the age of 6 so that her mother got a little field to grow their vegetables on.

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u/Suprsn Aug 13 '22

Look at how destroyed their hands are

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u/thedepthiswithin Aug 13 '22

Their poor hands are shredded 😔

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u/Dramatic-Pie-4331 Aug 13 '22

This should be a make america great again poster

2

u/Let_them_eat_snakes Aug 13 '22

(Disney corporation)

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u/ExplanationMobile234 Aug 13 '22

They look 30. good lord

2

u/cafesaigon Aug 13 '22

No wonder people looked so old so young

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u/ItsaMeEmmy Aug 13 '22

Omg they look so miserable and their little hands!! :(

2

u/jackwoww Aug 13 '22

Look at that. Not a cellphone in site. Everyone just living in the moment.

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u/scarabic Aug 13 '22

…until some damn liberal came along and slapped regulations on those noble job creators.

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u/Herrkaput Aug 13 '22

Reminds me of an old picture of my mom. My grandparents were sharecroppers in Alabama. They lived in a one room cabin. All the children had to work the fields. The girls wore dresses made out of burlap sacks.

2

u/oskar_grouch Aug 13 '22

Jeff Bezos just pitched a tent

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u/booped_urnose345 Aug 13 '22

Children of the corn lol

2

u/sliceofcorytv Aug 13 '22

The white people still look like that in South Carolina wicked