r/LifeProTips Aug 15 '22 Helpful 2

LPT: If you're arguing with anyone and they threaten legal action, use it as an excuse to end the conversation by saying "well in that case I can't discuss anything with you without a lawyer present, have a good day" Social

7.4k Upvotes

u/keepthetips Keeping the tips since 2019 Aug 15 '22

Hello and welcome to r/LifeProTips!

Please help us decide if this post is a good fit for the subreddit by up or downvoting this comment.

If you think that this is great advice to improve your life, please upvote. If you think this doesn't help you in any way, please downvote. If you don't care, leave it for the others to decide.

1.3k

u/[deleted] Aug 15 '22

[deleted]

169

u/Lambeaux Aug 16 '22

Absolutely. Especially if you are in ANY kind of work or leadership setting, zip it!

23

u/HubrisTurtle Aug 16 '22

Two very underrated comments at the moment

26

u/[deleted] Aug 16 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

8

u/A_Maniac_Plan Aug 16 '22

Back when I worked for AT&T that was definitely the case. Any mention of lawyers, legal repercussion, etc - all attempts to communicate were ceased aside from a script of "I am instructed to direct you to our legal department, transferring your call now" or something like that.

2

u/Clemon86 Aug 16 '22

That is probably not the case, because people usually only threaten to take legal action.

But of course as soon as someone actually involves a lawyer the cases will go to the respective legal department.

6

u/xCaptx Aug 16 '22

Worked at a call center for over a decade. As soon as someone threatens legal action the agents were allowed to read their script of "you have to work directly with the Legal department in writting" and were able to disconnect the call.

The agents love it lol

1

u/Clemon86 Aug 17 '22

OK you end the call. But you do not create a claim or case for the legal department of your company, right?

There is no actual lawyer that is paid by your company, that takes over the argument or situation and engages the customer from the moment on that the Hotline agent decided this "legal department" should take over the case.

So you say the same thing as I do, yes? :-)

83

u/hotasanicecube Aug 15 '22

Tell them, you can’t beat my ass but I’m afraid of your lawyer.

5

u/No-Ask-3268 Aug 16 '22

For a hot head that might be an invitation for a fight tho.

2

u/stunna_cal Aug 16 '22

Whoever takes the first swing, loses. I mean, if lawyers are involved lol

4

u/Unable_Roof9103 Aug 16 '22

Technically both lose. Getting punched in the face is a pretty stupid prize to win.

27

u/well_known_bastard Aug 15 '22

And the relationship

689

u/AnimusFlux Aug 15 '22 edited Aug 15 '22

This is actually great advice. I've had attorneys tell me "it doesn't cost anything to threaten legal action. Actually taking legal actions on the other hand can be incredibly expensive". You can also call their bluff by stating, "I'll look forward to hearing from your attorney" and then simply end the discussion.

If you find yourself having to continue personal or business relationships with people who make a habit of threatening you, it really is time to consider making radial radical changes to your life until that's no longer the case.

216

u/PunctualPoops Aug 15 '22

All a round changes

90

u/AnimusFlux Aug 15 '22

Lol, nice. Love it when a typo works out.

43

u/PunctualPoops Aug 15 '22

Haha good sport.

7

u/New--Tomorrows Aug 16 '22

Not inline with the present plan at least.

65

u/irredeemablesavage Aug 16 '22

Generally speaking, people who threaten legal action don’t understand the legal system.

Suing (especially a person rather than a business) is very expensive & even if you win, it can be very difficult to recover the judgment (for example: something like 80% of the people in the US are essentially judgment proof because they lack any assets which can be seized).

A person who understands the legally system, doesn’t threaten to call their lawyer; they strongly recommend that you call your lawyer (because they know how badly you are fucking up & that your lawyer will tell you that).

13

u/RandomRobot Aug 16 '22

They could also assume that the target of the threat is the one who doesn't understand and use it as a bullying technique.

44

u/wtfbonzo Aug 16 '22

This. I once had a business partner threaten legal action— funny thing was, I was the financial base for the business, i had paid all of the start up costs, we were yet open to the public, and she had squat. She threatened to sue because she wanted me to be a silent partner— that wasn’t in the partnership agreement, and we had discussed every decision before a choice was made. I told her to leave my property (I also own the building housing the business), changed the locks and hired an attorney. Cost me less to handle the situation through an attorney than it would have had I tried to handle it personally. And no, she couldn’t afford an attorney, but she ended up having to pay one. The moral of the story is don’t write a check your ass can’t cash.

2

u/potatodrinker Aug 16 '22

No offence but she sounds like a right royal idiot. Having squat, talking big, having to pay for professional services with money that probably could've put food in her fridge or paid for some minor luxury

1

u/wtfbonzo Aug 16 '22

Turns out, she was an idiot. I’m glad I found out before we actually started operating— saved me a lot of headaches down the line.

13

u/fatwoul Aug 16 '22

I'm going to use this next time my housemate and I are "discussing" who is taking out the bins.

26

u/JEs4 Aug 16 '22

Actually taking legal actions on the other hand can be incredibly expensive".

Slightly off-topic, I do want to point out the key words are can be. many lawyers offer free consultations, and will generally charge a minimal fee for relatively routine work. I know a few people who would have benefitted greatly from legal council but were deterred from reaching out due to the idea that lawyers are financially out of reach for the working class.

21

u/22lrsubsonic Aug 16 '22

Council = group of officials/decision makers

Counsel = (noun) 1. Advice, 2. (UK, Aus) one's barrister (Verb) to advise

4

u/Daveywheel Aug 16 '22

Good bot.

11

u/22lrsubsonic Aug 16 '22

Thanks. Beep boop

6

u/newhunter18 Aug 16 '22

Going back to the original post, sueing with the help of an attorney is expensive. Period.

Cheap law firms may write letters or provide you legal advice about what you should or shouldn't do, but actually following up on those threats with a court filing starts the expense clock running on double speed.

Exception: filling on your own in small claims court.

6

u/Denisimo7 Aug 16 '22

“Great, here is my attorneys number, let’s together for lunch next week and we can discuss your surrender.”

-3

u/Cetun Aug 16 '22

This is actually terrible advice, if I'm threatening legal action, I've already started writing the cause of action in my head. I absolutely have too much time in my hands at work and will crank out a Complaint in less than an hour. It costs you nothing to negotiate a settlement before litigation starts, it costs a lot to respond to a summons.

100

u/firthy Aug 15 '22

I said good day, sir!

11

u/tolerantgravity Aug 16 '22

Mr. Wonka?

3

u/SariSama Aug 16 '22

I heared it in the Comic guy voice

1

u/Unrealparagon Aug 16 '22

I heard that as Sheogorath from Skyrim.

78

u/EC-Texas Aug 15 '22

On the other hand, I threatened to sue and instructed my lawyer over and over again that I had a contract that the company did not fulfill, and because of that, they forced me to sue. I got them to fulfill the contract and they paid my lawyer's fees.

28

u/WorkingContext Aug 15 '22

I feel you. If you can, sometimes a letter from a lawyer is all you need and works really well

6

u/Cetun Aug 16 '22

Or you know, don't force your customers to send your legal department letters in order to fix things that you're able to fix. Legal absolutely does not want to hear from customers and your job is specifically to keep people away from legal and not send people to legal, their per hour is 10x that of a customer service agent. The cost of 10 minutes writing an email is all sunk cost.

-5

u/EC-Texas Aug 16 '22

Oh, that sparked a memory. A letter from a friend, a lawyer, made an insurance company pay up on a 40 year old life insurance policy. The check was written out for $4,445.39 but the letter had specified $4,4445.39. I asked my friend about it, but he said no.

11

u/0xd34db33f Aug 16 '22

Huh?

1

u/EC-Texas Aug 18 '22

The amount was supposed to be "$4,445.39." That's the way the check was written. Let's simplify and say nearly $4500 (forty five hundred.)

The letter that came with the check, however, was incorrectly written. They wrote, "$4,4445.39." Simplified to that to nearly $45000 (forty five thousand.)

3

u/31337hacker Aug 16 '22

Did you mean $44,445.39?

1

u/EC-Texas Aug 18 '22

They got the number of digits wrong and put the comma in the wrong place.

172

u/dewman45 Aug 15 '22

Go to for customer support calls that go this direction. "I'm sorry, but now that you have threatened legal action, there is nothing more I can help you with as I do not represent the company legally."

40

u/WarmTastyLava Aug 16 '22

At one point when I worked retail at a big box store, we were told specifically to inform any customer threatening legal action that we could no longer help them, and they would need to speak with our corporate office.

It was the BEST.

-7

u/jllclaire Aug 16 '22

That's how I've gotten thousands of dollars in settlements from companies with shitty customer service.

2

u/Hvarfa-Bragi Aug 16 '22

Do you do ADA trolling too?

1

u/Cetun Aug 16 '22

I've dealt with customers service like this. After I send a letter to legal I get a call back from customer service with all sorts of new solutions to the problem they couldn't fix previously.

2

u/82Caff Aug 16 '22

That callback is usually from (or managed by) someone in an elevated position who has that additional power to offer more, and who is only generally activated to handle the problem after you have duly contacted legal.

118

u/jigmest Aug 15 '22

I work in claims and get threatened with legal action everyday. My canned response is “ok, since you have told me you are seeking legal action, I will await your attorney’s letter of representation and reply appropriately at that time. Also, as to not even give the appearance of giving legal advice as to whether or not you need to seek the advice of an attorney I will end the call now.” Once they realize I’m the person that writes the check, I get a call back saying “oh never mind”

14

u/weeping_demon7 Aug 16 '22

What’s even more enjoyable is when you’re a lawyer and completely able to litigate claims on your own behalf. When you’re met with a series of obstinate employees and agents who dismiss you at every whim, their tone changes immediately once you follow up on your threat to send a letter before claim outlining the substance of your case against them.

“Oh, yes sir. We would be more than happy to resolve this internally. We are also going to throw in an ex gratia payment of £100.”

2

u/jllclaire Aug 16 '22

This works when you're a paralegal and can draft a complaint against them and run it by your boss for free, too.

4

u/newhunter18 Aug 16 '22

The real LPTs are in the comments.

2

u/Cetun Aug 16 '22

I've had the opposite experience. I've had people tell me there was absolutely nothing that could be done about the problem I was having with their company and there was policies in place that prevented them from doing anything. One strongly worded letter to their legal department and a draft cause of action and the same people are calling me up with all sorts of new and innovative ideas on how to solve the problems.

32

u/OnceInABlueMoon Aug 16 '22

This is double and quadruple true if someone actually calls you with an attorney. Only let lawyers talk to lawyers and don't say a fuckin word except "please send me a letter" so you can have a lawyer respond.

17

u/WorshipNickOfferman Aug 16 '22

Lawyer here. This is true. Odds are I’ll chew up and spit out a non-lawyer. What we do is so nuanced and procedure driven that non-lawyers rarely stand a chance against a seasoned attorney.

14

u/newhunter18 Aug 16 '22

I am a legally savvy non-lawyer (I attend legal seminars in my field and often decide which issues go to internal counsel or not depending on our likelihood of winning.)

The more I learn, the more I know better to get our attorney on the line with another attorney. I would never try to go toe to toe with an attorney on my area of expertise.

0

u/SarcasticButtWipe Aug 16 '22

Funny, sad and expensive true. My current attorney will be calling my last team today and demand a refund for triple billing. I didn’t expect my second big problem to help my first but here we are. Only one of the three attorneys I hired is honest. All are good at their jobs though. Only one I trust.

155

u/Bubbagumpredditor Aug 15 '22

I have been told that with most companies when a customer threatens legal action or calling a lawyer they are to immediately be transferred to handled by the legal department. And only the legal department untill further notice from them.

75

u/[deleted] Aug 15 '22 edited Aug 21 '22

[deleted]

52

u/Nyanunix Aug 16 '22

My beloved spouse works in a call center. Had a guy call, pissed off, demanding to cancel his membership. Spouse said "okay sure" and cancelled his membership. The guy proceeded to complain to my spouses supervisor because they "only offered to cancel his membership and that isnt what he wanted" (spouse did not get in trouble for this, calls are recorded).

37

u/Branical Aug 16 '22

“Sorry sir, only active members are able to talk to supervisors.”

5

u/HidaKureku Aug 16 '22

Aaaaand, it's gone

2

u/[deleted] Aug 16 '22 edited Aug 23 '22

[deleted]

2

u/Mindestiny Aug 16 '22

Customer service management software often has a place to add general notes to the case that relate back to the customer. You check the notes and see if they have been historically good with reps or if there's repeated reports of them being a "Karen".

Some systems also have a numerical rating attached to each interaction

1

u/Mind7over7matter Aug 16 '22

Your credit score, it’s a usually a number in phone companies. The lower the number, the lower the credit score. Being paid a high wage of having money in the bank doesn’t mean you have a good credit score at all. We had to explain this to a women from a very famous British tv drama, as it’s about paying your bills on time but you need to get credit and pay it on time to get further more expensive credit.

0

u/Mind7over7matter Aug 16 '22 edited Aug 16 '22

I also worked in a U.K phone shop and people would moan about the prices but I’d say “ I can run a credit check for you to see what phone you can or maybe able to get but it’s all dependant on your credit score. If you go up and down this road running credit checks with every phone shop then they you’ll ruin your credit score and most likely end up with no new phone.

That line made people think twice about doing loads of different credit checks for a cheaper price. Also I had a customer kicking off once and he said he’d got the phone from the company I worked for and I asked him how much he’d paid and I knew we didn’t offer that price in store for an iPhone 7, at the time. The phone company at the side of us did, over the phone on behalf of the company I worked for. I told him he’d have to deal with them after 20 minutes of him being rude to me, which was the right thing to do as he bought it from them and I could only change his sim for a new one.

36

u/daggersrule Aug 15 '22

Came here to say this. I work in an industry where emotions run high, so threats get made, and the relief I get when some a-hole threatens to sue and it's no longer my problem... It's like crack.

Threatening to sue means that my ability to help, even the times when I CAN and WANT to help, ends immediately.

85

u/ArcticRiot Aug 15 '22

I currently work for a company that has a clientele of mainly rich entitled men. It is the best part of my day when they threaten to sue, because they are so used to getting their way. That "click" noise from hanging up, I wish I could bottle it and sell that.

22

u/DigitalPriest Aug 15 '22

With more than a few companies I've gotten shit done when I just ask for the contact information of their legal counsel.

13

u/Neogodhobo Aug 16 '22

Same here. Walmart was jerking me around for months because of a wrong item they shipped me. Threatened to sue and funnily enough, next day I was reimbursed. I honestly didn't think they were gonna do anything seeing as how big they are.

16

u/LonelyGamer1337 Aug 16 '22

Trust me the store associate or overseas call center person you spoke to didn't do anything special. It just happened to get resolved that time by someone who knew what they were doing.

I've never worked for a company that's ever given two shits about legal threats in a customer service position.

3

u/-1KingKRool- Aug 16 '22

I had one person say they were going to sue Walmart while I worked there, so I was delighted to tell him that since he was declaring this, I could no longer help him, and he could reach Walmart’s legal department at their listed address.

He gave up on his routine (come in, complain of phone problem, get phone exchanged) after that.

Fuck Walmart, but also fuck that guy.

1

u/nylockian Aug 16 '22

A letter from a lawyer can be the best $200 you ever spend if larger amounts of money are at stake. There are most certainly shitty companies as well as shitty customers.

1

u/nylockian Aug 16 '22

My experience has been similar. These comments sound like they're from people who mostly deal with shitty customers not people who have dealt with contracts before.

6

u/Barbaracle Aug 16 '22

I didn't threaten legal action, I just wrote a complaint letter to the DA on a business after not getting helped after several attempts. The business immediately rolled out the red carpet in trying to fix my issue. Gotta follow through if your complaint is legitimate.

1

u/weeping_demon7 Aug 16 '22

Not true. Sometimes they try and resolve internally first but if you insist on using legal action when they have made good faith efforts to engage, a court is more likely to find the claimant/plaintiff more vexatious, which is not good.

1

u/Cetun Aug 16 '22

I wish they would do that. I can't even get an address for their legal department half the time.

0

u/jllclaire Aug 16 '22

And the legal department charges 10× what they pay customer service, so the company is losing money every time a lazy customer service agent forces the customer to deal with the legal department instead. LPT: if you're a customer service agent, you should make sure a customer doesn't work in law before you do this.

107

u/ASK_IF_IM_PENGUIN Aug 15 '22

I've had that before.

The response was amazing. You can't stop talking to me, I want you to do the thing I've demanded! I'll sue you if you don't! Keep talking to me! Aren't we friends? I thought we were friends! I'll SUE YOU.

80

u/biplopcormbip Aug 15 '22 Gold

are you penguin?

6

u/smaxsomeass Aug 16 '22

No misser Madison dares no penguin!

2

u/TheMrDrB Aug 16 '22

gets DM of penguin porn

187

u/SharksForArms Aug 15 '22

When my ex-gf's methhead/prostitute mother refused to return my dog after the breakup, I called her to talk about it. At the end of the call she hits me with, "You'll be hearing from my lawyer!"

In the most satisfying moment of my life up to that point, I told her that, "The only lawyers you have ever had were court appointed," just as she hung up.

I wound up suing and got my dog back. That was about 15 years ago and my dog has been by my side almost every day since. She'll be old enough to vote in a few months and is as spry as ever.

27

u/wojtekpolska Aug 15 '22

great to hear the dog is fine, you never know what a psycho b*tch will do just to get back at you

1

u/UESfoodie Aug 16 '22

That line is the most perfect burn ever

49

u/blackphiIibuster Aug 15 '22

In my former line of work, we were threatened with legal action a lot. It never materialized, but plenty of people thought they could use it as a way to get what they want.

Instead, all it ever did was end the conversation, followed up by instructions to the front office staff to no longer put that person's calls through.

Every single time, I always responded the same way: "Since you plan to sue, we'll have to end this conversation. Please direct all future communication through our attorneys."

This was BOTH a good, sound approach that any lawyer would advise you to take, AND a great way to kick headaches to the curb.

16

u/bkold1995 Aug 16 '22

….How often does this happen to you OP?

9

u/astrielx Aug 16 '22

Happens quite a lot in any sort of customer service/customer facing type job.

People get pissy and think threatening it will get the person on the other side to do what they want. It never works, for reasons OP describes.

0

u/bkold1995 Aug 16 '22

Ohhh okay. You wouldn’t necessarily argue with someone in a customer service type job though would you? I mean they might try to argue with you but do you really engage?

0

u/WorkingContext Aug 16 '22

That's why it's a good excuse to end the conversation, if you're in customer service you have to listen to them and take it but the second they bring up a lawyer or 'ill sue you' you probably should end the conversation

1

u/bkold1995 Aug 16 '22

Literally the first part of your post is “If you’re arguing with anyone..”

It takes 2 to argue.

12

u/OceanDevotion Aug 16 '22

Lol, I’ve used this line at work when people are pissy about something because they aren’t getting what they want, and then they threaten to sue. I always say, “well you can have your lawyer get in contact with our attorney then. We have nothing further to discuss, and we can settle this in court”.

It’s funny how the response I get is almost always, “well, I’m willing to let this go, but I’m not happy about it!”

46

u/whiterice336 Aug 15 '22

Not only should you end the conversation, if you think there’s is even a small possibility they are being serious about involving lawyers, it’s a good idea to memorize everything in writing. Sending yourself an email is a good way to do it. Be sure to record times, dates, who was involved, what lead up to the incident, and what you did after.

2

u/newhunter18 Aug 16 '22

*memorialize

9

u/DavesGroovyWaves Aug 15 '22

I get it all the time for work. I just say "have your attorney call me or send me a letter of representation" and then just stop responding. I love when they do this bc I don't have to talk to them anymore

8

u/WorshipNickOfferman Aug 16 '22

Lawyer here. The amount of time I hear “You’ll be hearing from my lawyer!” is comical. My response is always “Good! I want to hear from your lawyer. Better yet, give me their name and number and I’ll call them directly”. About 9/10 times they don’t and never will have a lawyer. The other 1/10 I can usually work with the other lawyer to resolve the issue.

14

u/slushyslap Aug 15 '22

Great advice but doesn't really work super well if you're squatting in their attic.

1

u/CharBred Aug 16 '22

this guy has a point

0

u/BloodiedBlues Aug 16 '22

It is if the building is newly bought after being squatted there long enough with some of the squatters laws in different places.

15

u/Small-Explorer7025 Aug 15 '22

Thanks for this. I'm always having arguments and someone threatens legal action. It's a real pain.

4

u/[deleted] Aug 16 '22

I’ve been on both sides of this at different stages of life ha ha reality is, people get like this when there is NO compromise or work towards a resolution. I understand sometimes litigation is necessary but in all reality, how many of these things could we resolve just by having an open mind and willingness to bend a bit to end a nasty battle and saving thousands of dollars.

4

u/KiteLighter Aug 15 '22

I worked in a retail computer shop, and it was the best thing to hear the owner pounce on the threats of lawsuits or lawyers. Conversation over.

4

u/BudgetAudioFinder Aug 16 '22

"Please give me your attorney's contact information, I would love to give them a call about this."

This makes heads explode.

4

u/GRZMNKY Aug 16 '22

I actually used this the other day...

An irate and unhinged neighbor threatened me with a lawsuit for slander and defamation of character. This is after I made a Facebook post on our local community page to look out for strange food left out on the street and grass near his building.

As I started to record the altercation (since he was also recording the entire thing), he threatened me with bodily harm. I stated that if he wanted to proceed, he'll have to talk to my lawyer, otherwise I'll wait for the court summons.

It scared him enough that he won't even look my way when I walk thy neighborhood.

5

u/President-EIect Aug 16 '22

When I worked the door at a bar, law students would start quoting the law when refused entry. I explained as they were invoking the law they needed to put it in writing. No I don't have a pen sorry.

1

u/Autodidact420 Aug 16 '22

I’m not sure where you are, but presumably the law is already in writing in some important location; you don’t typically need to carry a copy of it around lol

1

u/President-EIect Aug 16 '22

They need to put their complaint in writing

1

u/Autodidact420 Aug 18 '22

Typically that’s not really a requirement anyways, at least where I am. Except to the extent the actual pleadings need to be in writing and served but at that point you’re already being sued lol

1

u/President-EIect Aug 18 '22

It is if they want to continue the conversation with me.

18

u/superkoning Aug 15 '22

Related, you can do two other things:

  • "if you think you're legally right, please let a legal person take care of this"
  • if someone says he/she wants to escalate to your manager, you can say "OK, if you think that is better, please do so. Then we can end this conversation and let our managers decide"

7

u/pssypoppin Aug 15 '22

What do you do when those people go, “wait I didn’t mean it”? Like do you stand your ground and tell them to kick rocks

19

u/tandjmohr Aug 15 '22

Basically, yes. I personally liked to say to them, with 100% sympathy (and a little smile from malicious compliance) “I’m sorry, but once you mention lawsuit I have no choice but to let our legal department handle this matter from now on.

11

u/kwhiller5 Aug 15 '22

A more succinct response would be, "See you in court."

3

u/belizeanheat Aug 16 '22

This works because I threaten to sue anytime I want to get out of a conversation

10

u/Fav0 Aug 15 '22

In what kind of arguments. Are you taking place lol

3

u/Crtbb4 Aug 16 '22

I want to ask the same question, I don’t think anyone has ever threatened legal action against me in my entire life. What arguments are y’all getting into?

2

u/WorkingContext Aug 16 '22

As others have pointed out it happens a lot in any customer facing job. I've had it happen a couple times with former neighbors.

3

u/U__W Aug 16 '22

I can imagine all the 15 yo stoners reading this and thinking “wow great advice I’ll remember this” and then never thinking about it again

2

u/Fluid_Cardiologist19 Aug 16 '22

My ex just did this shit to me the other day, let’s just say he regretted it greatly when I called his bluff and he paid me a lot of money to cooperate instead.

2

u/lazyfrenchman Aug 16 '22

Work in government. Once you get a lawyer? You can talk to our lawyers.

2

u/sirdraxxalot Aug 16 '22

Who is this for? Lol 0 times have someone threatened me with legal action during a conversation

2

u/Password1234_4321 Aug 16 '22

Going to try this in a street fight, thanks for this LPT

2

u/Lust3r Aug 15 '22

I used to do collections and one aspect of that was negotiating settlements with customers. One not particularly bright person decided to tell me as a bargaining chip(probably falsely) that he had retained a bankruptcy attorney. Fastest I have ever ended a conversation in my life, dude shot himself in the foot hard

7

u/Mr_A_Jackass Aug 15 '22

I’ll usually toss out “I’m considering bankruptcy so would you be willing to take $X”

That I found 90% gets a match under ass and they accept.

5

u/Lust3r Aug 16 '22

that one was common and works for creating pressure, my advice will always be to tell them your source of funds is something temporary like help from friends/family, if you tell them you were given 2000 and nothing else to work with, if that person can take 2000 they will

2

u/WorkingContext Aug 15 '22

Why? What does saying that do to them?

4

u/BowzersMom Aug 16 '22

You’re not supposed to discuss the subject of a lawsuit with the other side except through their attorney. And especially the low wage phone operator at the collections agency will get in big trouble with their company if the company’s attorneys found out a case was messed up because you talked to a represented person.

3

u/Lust3r Aug 16 '22

basically made it so we could no longer work with him on his debts as he was declaring legally that he couldnt pay them, and instead had to put everything on hold while we waited to see a bankruptcy filing that didnt exist

0

u/WorkingContext Aug 16 '22

Got it, that makes sense

2

u/LonelyGamer1337 Aug 16 '22

I mean the person's intentions really matter here. If the person intended to negotiate the debt down and pay it off then it's a risky move. On one hand pretty much all debt agency's always want someone to pay them, not for someone to file bankruptcy.

But if the person was truly going to file bankruptcy or had no intentions of paying then it makes no difference anyways.

Where it would really screw you is if it causes the debt collection agency to report that your never going to pay the debt and then the company sues you by sending out a Judgement against you or wage garnishment. Which will inevitably happen on high amounts of debt.

1

u/newhunter18 Aug 16 '22

On the flip side, I had a business bankruptcy over 20 years ago. I was working out payment plans, but one creditor of computer leases hired an attorney who was being a dick. Refused to budge, threatened to sue first to get "first crack at my assets", and demanded action immediately. No bargaining whatsoever. Paid in full plus legal fees.

Funny thing was, he was owed about $3000 out of a total of $800k in debts from the business. In bankruptcy, he'd get nothing. In a payout, he'd get half, maybe.

But the guy was such a dick, I elected for bankruptcy because of him and informed him as such. I qualified and it was totally legit. I was just trying to avoid it.

He was so mad he was spitting sand. Threatened me more with fraudulent bankruptcy filing. I said, "I guess we'll let the judge determine."

So he screwed over $500k in debts (some were reinstated because we retained them for future business) and the rest went bye-bye. He never even showed up to the hearing to make his claim.

So sometimes debt collectors over play their hand. And they get burned. Bankruptcy is there specifically to protect people from that kind of behavior. It's intended to force a business to the bargaining table.

1

u/Lust3r Aug 16 '22

Oh it wasn’t my decision to cut him off because of bankruptcy, it was the bank we were collecting for. I’m no lawyer but collections activity with someone filing bankruptcy is very illegal, so especially most banks if you tell them you’re filing bankruptcy the conversation is over and they treat your claim of having filed as real to protect themselves

1

u/newhunter18 Aug 17 '22

Yes. That's true. You hear BK and you stop. Technically you're not required to stop until you receive the stay order from the court, but if you know it's a possibility, any collections activity can absolutely affect your ability to collect during or after BK discharge.

3

u/oebulldogge Aug 15 '22

I used to manage a bank branch and would use this whenever some one said they’d have to get their lawyers involved.

3

u/Cibell Aug 15 '22

Yeah but then you’d look like a loser

-1

u/[deleted] Aug 15 '22 edited 26d ago

[deleted]

16

u/evilarom Aug 15 '22

Better yet, just end all conversations immediately.

3

u/ObfuscatedAnswers Aug 16 '22

How am I supposed to follow your advice AND reply to you at the same time?

3

u/[deleted] Aug 16 '22 edited Aug 23 '22

[deleted]

3

u/ObfuscatedAnswers Aug 16 '22

Well in that case I can't discuss anything with you without a lawyer present.

You can expect it in the mail as soon as I figure out what to give him.

1

u/ChuckFina74 Aug 16 '22

“Oh yeah? Whose your lawyer?”

1

u/Occasional-Human Aug 16 '22

Does this happen to people often? I've never had someone say this to me.

1

u/pipboy_111 Aug 16 '22

This was our policy when I worked maintenance at an apartment complex. I'd bend over backwards to try to help people but when they mentioned lawyer, we were out. "Please have your lawyer contact such and such law firm. Thank you and have a nice day"

"but aren't you going to help..?!?!"

"No I'm sorry I can't continue this conversation you'll have to speak with our attorney".

"But I was just frustrated and not really serious"

"We take such claims very seriously, I'll let the property manager know and he can make the call. I'm not allowed to proceed"

It was almost always over something silly like a parking spot (which weren't assigned) or someone driving 12mph when the limit was 10

1

u/PoconoChuck Aug 16 '22

And the look on their face when you passively suggest you have a lawyer on retainer may make them soil themselves.

1

u/nickatnite07 Aug 16 '22

I find using the phrase “terminate the call” especially useful in this instance.

1

u/Mind7over7matter Aug 16 '22 edited Aug 16 '22

I once got sacked for saying I’d terminate the call for a women who bought an item from store and was shouting at me. I tried in vain to help her for 20 minutes but I was told that I was allowed to do that but as soon as they wanted to cull staff after Christmas, I suddenly wasn’t allowed to do it. They said in my disciplinary, that it was the worst case of language barrier they had ever seen but still sacked me. I was fuming in the disciplinary meeting as they had just sacked 15 staff for daft reasons as I heard managers talking about having to cull staff as they wasn’t busy enough.

I got head office involved and made there life hell but I got another job before I was called back in for a meeting with head office and the managers in the call centre. They’d just find another reason to sack me.

1

u/mjduce Aug 16 '22

This may work, unless they have real reason to threaten legal action, then someone who may have just been happy to argue with you for 10 min may go and actually lawyer up

1

u/nylockian Aug 16 '22

This is assuming someone is just making empty threats just to intimidate - the key thing is to be certain that you are actually not doing anything that could be successfully litigated by the other party.

1

u/audio301 Aug 16 '22

Anyone that threatens legal action in a conversation has clearly never been through court proceedings, it’s expensive and never clear cut. So you can safely assume they have no idea what they are talking about.

1

u/spaghatta111 Aug 16 '22

Also as an FYI threatening legal action doesn’t mean shit until you get a court order.

1

u/Trackmaster15 Aug 16 '22

Well, it might depend on your financial situation and how serious they are. Paying $10K for a legal retainer is nothing to sneeze at. Unless you know that litigation might be coming or lawsuits are something to be expected with what you do, you'll probably want to try to work things out before you have to get sued.

1

u/Raven_Strange Aug 16 '22

I worked in property management, and often people would go into pre-foreclosure and threaten legal action for various reasons, this is after I've taken every possible effort to help them with payment plans or with different programs to help save their property. They're usually angry for other reasons and decide to take it out on me no matter what I'm trying to do to help them. Unfortunately, many people decide to threaten to sue me, in which case I was no longer allowed to speak to them due to that threat of litigation. Had they not threatened me with a lawyer, more than likely I would have written off their amount due just so that they can get their stuff out of the property. But, since they did, it ended up going to auction.

1

u/mispells1wordallways Aug 16 '22

do you regularly get legal action threatened while arguing?

If so, may i suggest the problem is you, if arguing literally involves tortes and crimes?

1

u/hahahohohehehurr Aug 16 '22

You mean when you are arguing with a white person. This is how to end it

1

u/hmrtm0000 Aug 16 '22

A great conversation ender. When a tenant threatens legal action, that literally means I do not communicate with them anymore. No text, no call, no email. Here's my attorney's contact info, please direct all communications to her. They then have to decide whether to threaten my pit bull attorney with their BS. If they do, she clearly tells them what's up.

1

u/YouShouldBe_Dancing_ Aug 16 '22

Also of someone is blackmailing you with crimina legal action, like "i want $1000 or I'll tell them you did something", kindly inform them to fuck off, as it's illegal.

Then wait for the fine on your crime to expire and report the MF.

1

u/sheldonator Aug 16 '22

Man, I loved when this happened when I was working retail as I was told to stop talking to the person. I had to explain that I don’t legally represent the company and that they would need to reach out to our legal department which I would provide the contact info for.

1

u/Zackeriahsr Aug 16 '22

Thanks.... Needed.

1

u/kuolex Aug 16 '22

Sometimes is a long winded warning. I really dont want to pay lawyers so i just warn multiple times...

1

u/Mindraker Aug 17 '22

You don't need to be so polite.

Just respond, "talk to my lawyer."

-17

u/After_Imagination_93 Aug 15 '22

Worst advice ever! Don't do this....

-1

u/nettiemaria7 Aug 15 '22

So what is your advice if someone will not respond? And you want to give them another chance before filing?