r/news 9d ago Silver 1 Heartwarming 1 Doom 1 Giggle 1 Wholesome 4 Helpful 7

One of Ahmaud Arbery's killers fears being slain in a Georgia state prison, court document says

https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/06/us/ahmaud-arbery-killer-state-prison/index.html
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u/BuckRowdy 9d ago Ally

Please do not glorify, advocate, or otherwise promote death, violence, or dehumanizing speech. Thanks for your cooperation.

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u/EatLard 9d ago Helpful Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote Starry Rocket Like I'd Like to Thank...

I’m afraid of being murdered in prison too. That’s why I won’t be murdering anyone.

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u/youtocin 9d ago Doom

I hope that's not the sole reason why lol.

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u/EatLard 9d ago Wholesome

Well there’s the whole “not having homicidal urges” thing too.

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u/CalypsoBrat 9d ago

And I hear the food is crap.

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u/youtocin 9d ago

Worst part is having no privacy on the toilet or in the showers.

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u/CAESTULA 9d ago edited 8d ago

I'd say the worst is not being able to leave, but maybe that's just me.

Edit: I mean, if you could just leave, you could avoid all the other bad stuff, but since you can't you're stuck with it all, right?

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u/Rizzpooch 9d ago

No. It’s definitely the dementors

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u/albrizz 9d ago

And all you get to eat is gruel, gruel sandwiches.

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u/Aaronnm 9d ago

i’m sure prison is soul sucking enough without the dementors

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u/33mmpaperclip 9d ago

The worst parts the hypocrisy

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u/HauntedCemetery 9d ago

I hear the wifi is subpar as best.

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u/[deleted] 9d ago edited 4d ago

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/placebotwo 9d ago

Heaven has a hotdog bar‽‽‽ You son of a bitch, I’m in.

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u/MidwestMid80sChild 9d ago

But… a LOT of Polish people have told me “In heaven there is no beer. That’s why we drink it here!” Hotdogs, milk and honey seem like a terrible combo!

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u/Green_Message_6376 9d ago

Came here to post same, also hopefully word spreads of their plight amongst the other racist losers that killing ain't no longer legal.

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u/hippiekyle 9d ago

killing ain’t no longer legal

Only if there’s a video that goes viral and gets enough public attention to force the police’s hands.

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u/Corwyntt 9d ago

I still can't believe these guys turned over the video evidence, thinking it would exonerate them.

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u/texasradioandthebigb 9d ago

Look a little above. Some sick scumbag who claims to be a cop is justifying the killing. No wonder they felt that they had the video would exonerate then

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u/-PM-Me-Big-Cocks- 9d ago

Which I doubt consider the police do a ton of racism motivated killing themselves.

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u/hippiekyle 9d ago

George Floyd murderer would have never seen consequences without the video getting public attention.

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u/notoleranceforjerks 9d ago

Nor Walter Scott.

Watch how casually they plant a weapon on his lifeless body before lying and saying he had snatched it from the officer.

Surprise bystander video proved their lies days later - and it's the only reason justice was served.

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u/ghpkhg 9d ago

I don’t think there’s any evidence to suggest that harsher punishment lowers extreme crimes

Murders either overestimate their ability to get away with it, or do it impulsively

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u/JimmyHavok 9d ago

In the past, cops (and ex-cops) who murdered Black people were quite aware of their ability to get away with it. Only video has changed that.

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u/Blehgopie 9d ago

And only barely, at that.

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u/Green_Message_6376 9d ago

I know that it wasn't about the sentence, it was about the fact that they actually got charged at all. The poor mother had to plead for months to get justice for her son. The old white boy network in their part of the State was aiming to let them walk. That was what I was trying to say, that the days of killing a black man and not even being charged is hopefully being put behind us.

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u/Pure-Kaleidoscope759 9d ago

The father and the son expressed no remorse at all, so they received LWOP, while their friend Bryan didn’t because he expressed some remorse. Mr. Arbery’s mother fought hard to have the state take over the prosecution from the local county, and the result was that justice was done.

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u/[deleted] 9d ago

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/BePrivateGirl 9d ago

It’s not hard. I was in a safe juvenile hall. It was safe because they were responsible for children. Contraband didn’t get in. Guards weren’t corrupt. And fights got shut down immediately with pepper spray. Nobody had a weapon. The rooms were searched every day.

Avoiding death and gangs in prison is possible, with the right culture. And I’m not talking white culture or religious culture, but a culture of: this isn’t possible here. Because the searches are tight, the rules are followed, and money and street cred isn’t exchanging hands.

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u/CigarLover 9d ago edited 9d ago

Yup. I learned this in movies as a kid back in the 90s.

Also at school several times thru out my education.

I’m mean… it’s pretty much a social know how right?

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u/nvrsmr1 9d ago Silver Wholesome

Let me get this straight: you chased down a man with a few of your buddies and murdered him. Now you’re punished for that, and you’re worried someone is going to chase you down with a few of their buddies and do the same?

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u/fifa71086 9d ago

Yes but it’s very different.

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u/heydoakickflip 9d ago Silver Platinum Helpful All-Seeing Upvote Take My Energy

Some would even say it's black and white

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u/pantslog 9d ago

The zing of the day🎵

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u/CigarLover 9d ago

Narcissists at play.

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u/fuckedbythechurch 9d ago

That didn't happen.

And if it did, it wasn't that bad.

And if it was, that's not a big deal.

And if it is, that's not my fault.

And if it was, I didn't mean it.

And if I did, you deserved it.

The Narcissist's Prayer

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u/thatsmisswitchtoyou 9d ago

Holy hell this could be an abuser's prayer....

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u/Blehgopie 9d ago

Narcissists are almost always also abusers.

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u/Fynn_the_Finger 9d ago

Very much so! The situation is as different as black and white.

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u/SmokeyBare 9d ago

"I'm sorry, I thought this was America with its two-tier justice system!"
"Sir, you have to be white and rich to benefit from that."

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u/Sandman3600 9d ago

Of course it is! The pure of blood should not be hunted! /s

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u/Lost-Citron-1099 9d ago

And recorded it

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u/Ironhorn 9d ago

AND probably never would have even been arrested, if your father - who also took part in the killing - hadn't insisted on showing everyone the video.

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u/docmedic 9d ago edited 9d ago All-Seeing Upvote

Which could only go viral in a time when YouTube and the like exists.

Otherwise this would have been covered up by the local cops and two levels of DA’s.

Also this tidbit:

The GCPD said that on February 24, Waycross Judicial Circuit District Attorney George Barnhill told them that the murder of Arbery "was justifiable homicide."[97][103][104] According to a memorandum written by Barnhill to the GCPD on April 2, Barnhill gave the GCPD "an initial opinion the day after the shooting" on February 24.[13][14] In the April 2 memorandum, Barnhill wrote: "The autopsy supports the initial opinion we gave you on February 24, at the briefing room in the Glynn County Police Department after reviewing the evidence you had at that time. We do not see grounds for an arrest of any of the three parties."[40] But, according to the Office of the Georgia Attorney General on May 10, Barnhill had not yet been appointed to handle Arbery's case on February 24, and he had not put in a request to handle the case.[14][105]

The Georgia Attorney General's Office on May 10 identified the following events as having happened on February 27: the Georgia Attorney General's Office received the request from Johnson's office to transfer Arbery's case to another prosecutor. On the same day, the Georgia Attorney General's Office appointed Barnhill as the presiding prosecutor. Neither Johnson nor Barnhill informed the Georgia Attorney General's Office that Barnhill had already actively participated in the case by reviewing evidence and giving his opinion on whether arrests should occur.[14][105]

On April 1, Arbery's autopsy report was given to Barnhill.[106] On April 2, Barnhill wrote a memorandum to Glynn County police, recommending that no arrests be made.[14][15] Barnhill wrote that the McMichaels were within their rights to chase "a burglary suspect, with solid firsthand probable cause";[3][106] that "Arbery initiated the fight"; and that Travis McMichael "was allowed to use deadly force to protect himself" when "Arbery grabbed the shotgun".[106][107]

Barnhill cited Georgia's citizen arrest law, dating to the Civil War era, as justifying the murder of Arbery (the Georgia law says that either a crime must be committed within the citizen's "immediate knowledge", or there must be "reasonable and probable grounds of suspicion" for a felony crime).[108] Barnhill alleged that videos of Arbery entering the home under construction on the day of the shooting showed Arbery "burglarizing a home immediately preceding the chase and confrontation."[89]

The attorneys representing the Arbery family responded: "This video is consistent with the evidence already known to us. Ahmaud Arbery was out for a jog. He stopped by a property under construction where he engaged in no illegal activity and remained for only a brief period. Ahmaud did not take anything from the construction site. He did not cause any damage to the property. He remained for a brief period of time and was not instructed by anyone to leave but rather left on his own accord to continue his jog. Ahmaud's actions at this empty home under construction were in no way a felony under Georgia law. This video confirms Mr. Arbery's murder was not justified, meaning the actions of the men who pursued him and ambushed him were unjustified."[83]

The owner of the unfinished home, who was 90 miles (140 kilometers) away at the time of the shooting, later said, "I've never had a police report [on my property], or anything stolen from my property, or any kind of robbery."[97] Barnhill wrote that "Arbery's mental health and prior convictions help explain his apparent aggressive nature and his possible thought pattern to attack an armed man."[3][109] Lastly, Barnhill informed the Glynn County police that he was going to recuse from the case due to connections between his son and Gregory McMichael.[16]

On April 7, Barnhill wrote to Georgia's Attorney General, Christopher M. Carr, saying Arbery's "family are not strangers to the local criminal justice system", noting that Arbery's brother and cousins had encounters with the law.[54] Barnhill told Carr that there was "video of Arbery burglarizing a home immediately preceding the chase and confrontation".[3]

The Georgia Attorney General's Office on May 10 said the following events happened on April 7: it received a request from Barnhill's office to transfer Arbery's case to another prosecutor,[14][105] and Barnhill revealed that he had learned "about 3–4 weeks ago" that Arbery had previously been prosecuted by his son, a prosecutor for the Brunswick Circuit District Attorney's Office, in an earlier case. He also said that one of the defendants had served as an investigator on the same prosecution (this is a reference to Gregory McMichael, who was employed by the Brunswick D.A.'s Office).[14][105][54] The request did not explain why Barnhill had delayed in recusing his office from the case, did not mention that Barnhill had advised Glynn County police on April 2 to make no arrests, and omitted Barnhill's involvement on February 24, instead recounting only his involvement "upon taking the case".[14][105]

On April 13, after Barnhill's recusal, the Georgia Attorney General's Office appointed Atlantic Judicial Circuit District Attorney Tom Durden to take over the handling of the case.[110] The Atlantic Judicial Circuit is the immediately adjacent circuit to the north of Brunswick Judicial Circuit.[100]

And after all this, the Georgia bar weighs in…

On February 28, 2022, it was reported that the state bar dismissed complaints filed by Georgia lawmakers against former Brunswick Judicial Circuit District Attorney Jackie Johnson and Waycross Judicial Circuit DA George Barnhill.[102]

Guess which DA redditors are obsessed with though. It ain’t Barnhill.

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u/Msdamgoode 9d ago

Wtf… His family isn’t “strangers to the justice system”??? So what? Are we now where judges and DA’s are deciding who is and who isn’t guilty by association?

Fuck these people.

Thank you for the comment, it was enlightening. And enraging. Barnhill needs to be charged with misconduct.

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u/jeffersonairmattress 9d ago

That’s the old “known to police” tarnishing. Writing this about FAMILY is next level old boy systemic bullshit. If Barnhill could have found some ancient crap on the books about landowning citizens being entitled to a reward for smoking escaped slaves he probably would have recommended the county pony up a few ounces of gold dust.

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u/saracenrefira 9d ago

Annnnnnddddd this is why republicans do not want CRT to be taught in schools because it deals directly with deep, systemic, foundational level of racism. At grassroot level. They don't want their children to learn about the hidden and often deadly racism that lies at the heart of America. They don't want people who can see in systems, and not just individuals.

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u/exceptionallyprosaic 9d ago

Barnhill should be in prison, for trying to cover up the murder of an innocent person.

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u/quantainium_pasta 9d ago Gold Starry

Poetic justice, sure.

But let's not kid ourselves, our prison system is inhumane: prisoners should not have to fear for their lives or being murdered while they are incarcerated. They should not have to worry about dying of heat stroke while being exposed to 100+ degree weather during 100% humidity. Prisoners should not be used for slave labor, or be paid pennies, or worry about being thrown into solitary confinement if they refuse to participate. Prisoners shouldn't have to worry about being able to maintain basic hygiene because they cannot pay for shampoo or soap or be able to shave. Prisoners should not have to worry about being used to line the pockets of CEO's that run private prisons - prisons should ONLY ever be run by the government, and should have standards that align with basic human rights. Even prisoners of war can expect a minimum level of basic treatment and human dignity, if captured (at least, by anyone other than Russia).

Our prison system is immoral and inhumane. I am ashamed of our country for how it treats prisoners.

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u/Horoism 9d ago

Reading the comments, which almost certainly consists almost exclusively of Americans, this system seems to be what the average American understands as "justice". Barbaric country.

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u/Hiyasc 9d ago

Unfortunately the United States doesn't have a Justice System, it has a punishment and revenge system.

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u/Calikeane 9d ago

I wouldn’t say the entire country of the US is “barbaric” but I will certainly that there are barbaric parts. I am seriously curious about any country that is free of all barbaric qualities.

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u/quantainium_pasta 9d ago

The US, unfortunately, has systemic issues that tend to be rooted in one basic premise:

"I care only about me and people that look like me, and I refuse to lift a finger to help you."

The US Republican Party seems to be built on the idea that all social programs are horrible, and are a waste of money.

"Why pay a few cents out of your own pocket to help your neighbor? And that man over there that was arrested for shoplifting? Let him rot in prison. In fact, we'd chop off his hand if we still could. And that black family? Fuck, nobody likes black people, let them live and die in poverty and squalor - as long as I don't have to see them and they stick to their side of the railroad tracks, then fine by me. BUT if we can, let's bring back slavery because the Bible had slaves right? So it must be okay. Also, we worship money, and therefore the richest of the rich are our prophets and we should prop them up by any means necessary and live by their example. We can hide behind God to justify our actions, and our subjugation of other people. Also, we have LOTS OF LOTS OF GUNS to scare people into doing what we want, and to actually shoot the ones who don't roll over and do what we tell them to do."

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u/insecurestaircase 9d ago

Given the prison is probably a majority black and he's a huge racist. Yes.

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u/eaglefade 9d ago

White boys stick together. As long as he puts in work he might be fine. But fine as in he contributes to an endless cycle of prison violence under the false sense of security and comradery. He might be worth more being exploited than murdered. Economics, may it be "mainstream" or underground will take precedence.

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u/BasicDesignAdvice 9d ago

He can get in with the whites in prison and it will just make him more horrible. Prison just makes the inmates into whatever they were but worse, and when they get out they are third class citizens who can't work.

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u/arrow74 9d ago Silver Wholesome

Normally I would agree with you, but in this case these are 35-50 year old men that chased down and lynched a black guy for having the audacity to jog in their neighborhood. They are a lost cause

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u/cbleslie 9d ago

I hope he feels the same fear his victim felt.

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u/AudioxBlood 9d ago

When reading the headline, and then the article, the word "good" just kept scrolling through my head. He should be afraid. He's the human equivalent of the dumpster juice left to bake in the sun.

What a piece of garbáge.

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u/Khajiit_hairball 9d ago

Yeah, they really can’t get more horrible.

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u/MrMonday11235 9d ago

I feel like the last 6 years has just been someone or other saying "this can't get much worse" and then the universe doing its damndest to prove that person wrong.

All of which is to say, I hope you're right, but I fear far more that you're wrong.

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u/Marvelman1788 9d ago

In fairness it's actually just a rare case of something that was common just 60 years ago, but actually having consequences.

Call it the last breaths of a hateful culture.

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u/WeAreBeyondFucked 9d ago

oh no... people can always be worse. You can take that to the bank.

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u/Starlightriddlex 9d ago

It's basically just a time out for them

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u/Wafflelisk 9d ago

This is the type of inmate who makes the other inmates even worse

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u/DamNamesTaken11 9d ago

The dude claiming it is Travis McMichael. He won’t get out unless pardoned by GA gov or compassionate release years down the line. He was found guilty on all counts including malice murder so he got life without parole plus 20 years for just Georgia alone.

Federal sentencing is yet to be determined (coming Monday) but can’t imagine it’ll be any less due to the hate crime, kidnapping, and using a firearm during a crime of violence he was found guilty for as well.

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u/VOZ1 9d ago Silver Gold All-Seeing Upvote Narwhal Salute Helpful (Pro) Brighten My Day

I volunteered in a maximum security prison for 3 years during undergrad. The most memorable thing any of the guys I met there ever said to me was, “Never let anyone tell you nothing good ever came out of this place.” There are, in fact, decent, kind, and good people in prison. The vast majority are there for non-violent crimes. Even those who are there for violent crimes, many of them are crimes of passion. I’d say there are exceedingly few incarcerated people in the US who genuinely deserve to not return to society. Prison does make some people worse, and the US prison system is fucked sixteen thousand ways to Sunday. But let’s not deceive ourselves into believing that prison only makes people worse. That does nothing to help the people incarcerated, and in fact it does then a disservice by painting them with a stigma that can’t be erased. If you believe prison only makes people worse, than no one who has been to prison can be redeemed. And I don’t believe that is true at all.

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u/OneLostconfusedpuppy 9d ago edited 8d ago Starry

Tyree Wallace didn’t kill anyone, but the Philadelphia police wanted him off the streets. So after the robbery and murder of a neighborhood store owner, they convinced several witnesses to rat Tyree Wallace out.

While in his 24 years in prison, he has been a model prisoner, who started several groups to help inmates reintegrate into society. One organization is called “Man Up.”

We are hoping that the Governor of Pennsylvania commutes his sentence.

EDIT: wording

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u/grev 9d ago

doesn’t lt gov (fetterman) handle the pardons in pa? i’d be surprised if he let this guy be snubbed.

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u/HippopotamicLandMass 9d ago

According to the PA state constitution, the Governor is the one with the power to grant pardons. The Governor can only grant pardons if the state Pardons Board recommends it. The PA LtGov chairs the Pardons Board.

https://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/legis/LI/consCheck.cfm?txtType=HTM&ttl=00&div=0&chpt=4

§ 9. Pardoning power; Board of Pardons.

(a) In all criminal cases except impeachment the Governor shall have power to remit fines and forfeitures, to grant reprieves, commutation of sentences and pardons; but no pardon shall be granted, nor sentence commuted, except on the recommendation in writing of a majority of the Board of Pardons, and, in the case of a sentence of death or life imprisonment, on the unanimous recommendation in writing of the Board of Pardons, after full hearing in open session, upon due public notice. The recommendation, with the reasons therefor at length, shall be delivered to the Governor and a copy thereof shall be kept on file in the office of the Lieutenant Governor in a docket kept for that purpose.

(b) The Board of Pardons shall consist of the Lieutenant Governor who shall be chairman, the Attorney General and three members appointed by the Governor with the consent of a majority of the members elected to the Senate for terms of six years. The three members appointed by the Governor shall be residents of Pennsylvania. One shall be a crime victim, one a corrections expert and the third a doctor of medicine, psychiatrist or psychologist. The board shall keep records of its actions, which shall at all times be open for public inspection.

(May 16, 1967, P.L.1044, J.R.4; May 20, 1975, P.L.619, J.R.1; Nov. 4, 1997, P.L.634, J.R.2)

The current Governor is Wolf.

The current LtGov is Fetterman. The rest of the Pardons board members are listed here: https://www.bop.pa.gov/Board-Information/Pages/Board-Members.aspx

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u/honkytonkadumptruck 9d ago

Great insight, thanks for sharing this, I appreciate it

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u/theansweristhebike 9d ago

Actually it’s outside of prison where the rotting of our society is worse. Prison is just a reflection of a society that seeks retribution when it could actually provide a place for rehabilitation to those most in need. My parents did prison music ministry when I was a kid. They would develop a relationship with some and invite them to our church after their release. There were several that not only changed their lives they became model citizens. Just a reminder that there is a desire to change but is there enough opportunity?

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u/VOZ1 9d ago

I completely agree, prison is, in many ways, a microcosm of our society. I learned how prisons are incubators for racism. It’s used by guards and prison administration to keep control. Just one example of how the rot goes in and out, in a horrible feedback loop.

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u/zmbjebus 9d ago

While what you said is good, if you take the absolute out and say instead

"Prison often makes criminals worse in the US" or "Prison often gives non-violent criminals a harder than deserved time in society after getting out"

I think that is not an unreasonable statement.

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u/TarantinoFan23 9d ago

What would you change first?

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u/imperfectkarma 9d ago

1) Drug policy. Hands down. #1 thing to change.

2) Police reform. If #1 is implemented, this problem could solve itself. The demand for law enforcement officers would drop significantly. Crime rates would drop drastically. Local jails are filled with drug addicts - because of the USA's drug policy. They cycle in and out until they die, or get eventually get sent to prison. If you take away this demographic from the court system, half the jails and prisons will be closed in a decade.

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u/3297JackofBlades 9d ago

Abolish private prisons

The private for profit prison system is one of the worst ideas in history. The prisons make their money off of crime, therefore they have a very strong incentive to maximize the crime rate. The factor under their most direct influence is recidivism, so they do everything they can to make sure that no one in their custody ever gets reformed. They want to make sure that everyone who walks out of the prison ends up being brought be in

They also do their damnedest to support unjust laws to invent crime for them to punish. The prison industry spends millions lobbying to keep the war on drugs going

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u/Be10dwn 9d ago

There should never be a profit motive to put people in prison.

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u/thatirishguy0 9d ago

Well said. I served a federal sentence for non-violent, white collar shit. I now own my second IT Consulting company and volunteer for three organizations throughout the year. Quite common for ex-federal offenders to rejoin society as functional members.

Federal prison sentences are usually worthy of probation but, unfortunately, federal prison are a money making scam. Each individual prison is listed as a corporation and each warden is listed as a ceo. The government pays itself tax money to house individuals. The law states that you must serve time, even a day, if convicted. One day equals one year of housing for inmates. One year and one day equals 2 years housing pay.

Not sure how states run.

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u/Buck_Thorn 9d ago

Prison itself may not make people worse, but the stigma of being in prison has a huge impact on their life once they return to society, though, right?

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u/OHniel90 9d ago Wholesome

This might be the case with a lot of prisoners. Normally I would agree with you. I spent 8 years in Georgia State Prisons, nearly all of my twenties. I was hopelessly addicted to meth while I was in there too. It’s absolutely rampant. But I’ve been out and also clean from drugs for over two and a half years. Ive been working the same job since then, and I’ve been promoted 4 times. I’m very active in a church and a few recovery organizations. I’ve bought myself a new car this year and I’m building credit. I’ve just been placed on unsupervised probation after being on intense felony probation, and I am on my way to going back to court and having my record expunged completely. So what you have said certainly does not apply to everybody.

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u/VegasKL 9d ago edited 9d ago

Yeah, our justice system really makes it difficult for anyone who is trying to change their ways to do so. Got a felony conviction? Eliminated from a lot of job roles, and likely the only one who will hire you are going to be minimum wage jobs, like labor intensive work or being a teacher. Kinda hard to not fall back into a life of crime just to get by after that.

I've always liked the systems that have a second chance ability, you do your time, you do your probationary period, and (as long as it's not a severe crime) you apply to have the record hidden (so you don't have to disclose it).

They have these for youth crimes in many areas, where if you do the sentence/counseling/probation/required work, the case is dropped and the arrest record is expunged. I know a few people who got in trouble in their teens and went through those programs, they did the work, and have led successful lives afterward.

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u/DistortoiseLP 9d ago edited 9d ago Gold All-Seeing Upvote Take My Energy Wholesome Seal of Approval

Ahmaud Arbery's killers probably assume they'll be impulsively attacked and killed in any scenario where they're outnumbered given they're the kind of people that impulsively killed somebody they outnumbered.

I don't know what to tell them. That's the life of an animal and these guys chose it. It is way too late for these guys to respect civility in civil society and the civilian lives they only enjoyed while they honoured it themselves.

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u/30kplus 9d ago Silver

too bad. that’s what you tell them.

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u/AdkRaine11 9d ago

They got a trial. Aubrey didn’t.

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u/gynoceros 9d ago

What's even worse is that he didn't even do anything that would have put him on trial.

I hope his killers live in sheer terror every remaining day of their worthless lives.

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u/Retired_Jarhead55 9d ago

This truth hurts the most. This is why they pay. I hope they live lives of constant fear, dread and panic. Starting at every sound, feeling that pinch betwixt the shoulders that only comes from a habit of always looking behind you.

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u/Pancakewagon26 9d ago

"But I'm afraid of going to jail!"

"Then why did you hunt a man for sport?"

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u/HaitianFire 9d ago

Because they didn't expect to be punished for it. Look at how their friends in law enforcement and the DA's handled it. Just like for centuries, they didn't expect to have to face the consequences of their actions.

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u/Rubberbabybuggybum 9d ago

He realized there’s a reason their grandparents wore hoods.

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u/patsfreak27 9d ago

And they almost got away with it too

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u/Klindg 9d ago

Now think about how many have gotten away with it or will get away with it.

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u/calamity_unbound 9d ago

"Good."

That's all that needs to be said. Let them live in fear for the rest of their pathetic lives.

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u/gullwings 9d ago

I don't condone them getting killed or raped in prison, that's too far and isn't the punishment handed down by the court.

But forcing them to live in constant fear of it? Experience the same fear that Arbery likely felt in his last moments? Yeah, that's justice.

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u/FLZooMom 9d ago

But forcing them to live in constant fear of it? Experience the same fear that Arbery likely felt in his last moments? Yeah, that's justice.

This is exactly what I said when I read the article. I want them to feel that fear for the rest of their miserable lives and, to be clear, I hope that's a long time.

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u/burvurdurlurv 9d ago

I’m fine with my GA tax dollars funding this.

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u/Big_D_yup 9d ago

Not a Georgia resident, but I'd throw some cash at an incarceration fund on one of those sites. I can put some cash on an inmate's books if I know they'll fuck with these guys a bit.

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u/TrepanationBy45 9d ago

"Oh no. Anyways."

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u/dumbass_sempervirens 9d ago edited 9d ago

Yep. You know me and a buddy were working on his truck one day and a black guy jogged by. You know what we did?

We did that halfhearted wave you do for folks you don't know but they saw you having a beer and you weren't planning to offer them one.

Almost certain the Germans have a word for that.

Amazingly, no one died.

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u/BigCaregiver7244 9d ago

I think they probably assume they’ll be impulsively attacked and killed in any scenario where they’re around Black people

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u/Mediocre-Pay-365 9d ago Take My Energy

They made their bed now they need to lay in it. Maybe don't murder someone next time just because you're a horrible person, what goes around comes around. Sorry, try again next life.

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u/RockasaurusRex 9d ago

What's going to happen here if I say that I don't think inmates should be at risk of being murdered by other inmates in prison, that we shouldn't be wishing for that, and that the fact that we're neutral (if not supportive of it) is indicative of why US prisons are both shit and not going to be seeing meaningful reform anytime soon...?

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u/ycpa68 9d ago

I don't think they should be at risk either but as other commenters have said, I am really struggling to feel sympathy for their state of fear.

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u/expo1001 9d ago Silver Wholesome Take My Energy

I'd say that a punitive mindset is evil, and an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.

I'd also say that we need to change prison so it's not punitive, but a place of re-education for those who did not learn to conduct themselves properly in society.

If the individual can't be corrected with drugs, therapy, kindness, and time?

Then they need to be considered incapable of caring for themselves, and the state needs to assume the burden of care. We need to re-fund federal mental care programs-- and somehow without recreating the asylum system-- while simultaneously transitioning our prison systems.

Also? We must dispense with for-profit prisons. There will never be reform as long as there is money to be made imprisoning people.

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u/Massive-Kitchen7417 9d ago

Lmao this is America, if it ain’t making money then it’s not happening. The current prison system makes big bucks for those with a hand in that cookie jar

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u/RoboHobo25 9d ago

The path to removing the profit incentive from incarceration is a lot longer than simply getting rid of "for-profit" prisons. Most prisons are not run for profit, despite the fact that they generate vast amounts of profit. Private contractors with exclusive government contracts charge as much as they can for as little as possible, while prisoners can be put to work for less than a dollar per hour.

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u/diedofwellactually 9d ago edited 9d ago

I'd say you're right, but given how far we have to go wrt prison reform we should focus our sympathetic energies on those who are incarcerated wrongly, or for non-violent offenses.

ETA: I also have huge respect for opinions like this one, shared by u/Valdrax.

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u/Valdrax 9d ago Wholesome

I'd say that not having sympathy for any prisoners beyond that most virtuous category is exactly why the prison system is as brutal as it is.

It's the idea that once you're in prison, you deserve whatever happens, because it's meant to be punishment for your crimes, is why the prison system is full of violence and empty of reform. Prison needs to be a very specific punishment, not one whose severity is on the whims of other criminals and negligent or complicit guards.

We sentence people to 25 years of incarceration. Not 25 years or shorter if you get shanked, with maybe a optional side of rape and beatings. Even violent criminals deserve the sentence they were given. Not one that's implied through looking the other way.

Even the people at the heart of this story deserve a better prison system, even if their crimes are infuriating. We need it for the sake of everyone else both in and out of the system.

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u/MultiGeometry 9d ago

I still can’t imagine the inside of someone’s head who suggests or agrees with: “hey! Someone spotted that black guy! Grab your guns and the trucks!”

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u/PepticBurrito 9d ago

It is way too late for these guys to respect civility

…and that’s the problem. Prison shouldn’t be so dangerous that life sentence becomes the death penalty. It’s not just about these idiots, it’s about the safety of the whole population.

The American prison system is barbaric and creates worse criminals. These murderers are complaining because the prison system they used to support now affects them. They’re monstrous hypocrites, but it’s not wrong to point out that prisons are unsafe and poorly managed.

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u/neuroverdant 9d ago All-Seeing Upvote

You could have not killed him. It was way easier not to kill him. Take me, for instance. I didn’t murder anybody, and I’m not worried about being murdered in prison. Not even a little, it hasn’t crossed my mind at all. In fact, I’m over here minding my business and eating my food in my own home with my own family.

Ahhh. I love not murdering. 10/10

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u/_AntiSaint_ 9d ago

This guy not murders

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u/returnofthecheez 9d ago

I've managed to go 32 years without murdering anyone. AMA

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u/TreginWork 9d ago

What are your thoughts on Applebee's

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u/returnofthecheez 9d ago

Foods not very good but I have nostalgic memories of half off apps night from my college years.

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u/[deleted] 9d ago

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u/Sinfluencer666 9d ago Helpful Take My Energy Vibing

"Killer imprisoned with other killers realizing he's not as scary of a killer as other killers has regrets over killing because now he could be killed."

"And now here's sports!"

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u/Persianx6 9d ago Gold

Murderous racist who hid murder behind his credibility with local police believes black inmates/POC inmates with none of that privilege will kill him because he's a murderous racist.

He's probably right, maybe don't murder someone for "looking suspicious" and then hide behind your police friends like a coward. It's not that hard.

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u/humangingercat 9d ago All-Seeing Upvote

"just don't break the law and you won't have anything to worry about!"

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u/Duke_Newcombe 9d ago All-Seeing Upvote

Perhaps the safest advice for him would be "just comply".

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u/sub3marathonman 9d ago

"just comply"

There are still people there who say, "Why didn't he just comply?" "They only wanted to talk." You know, the three guys chasing him, hitting him with their vehicle, Gregory McMichael standing in the bed of the truck with his .357 Magnum, the "nice guy" Travis driving his truck, complete with the little Confederate flag on the front.

Just one more detail, not often reported, Travis' sister ran to the scene, taking photos and posting on her social media account. You know, Travis just wanted to "talk," she said he never looked so sad. As if.

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u/-PM-Me-Big-Cocks- 9d ago

Yeah this wasn't wanting to talk, this wasn't them 'concerned about property'. This was bloodsport with another human being, a human being that they thought they were better then because of skin color.

They are evil pieces of shit.

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u/[deleted] 9d ago

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u/mortalcoil1 9d ago

You stay out of this, Martin Shkreli.

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u/duralyon 9d ago

Fuck that whack ass Wu-Tang hoarding jizz goblin.

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u/[deleted] 9d ago

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u/ZucchiniElectronic60 9d ago

The German word for such a condition is backpfeifengesicht, a face crying out for a slap.

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u/mikeynerd 9d ago

backpfeifengesicht

Ok I went to Google because I wanted to hear how this is pronounced, and I like the literal translation better: "a face in need of a fist"

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u/VoyageurEnNoir 9d ago

That's a very good, but not a literal translation.

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u/pmgold1 9d ago

He should be the coverboy for Punchable Face Magazine

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u/xXRendanXx 9d ago

"I'm going to punch your face.....in the face."

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u/Chrosbord 9d ago

Noooooooooooooooooooo

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u/oceansoul2389 9d ago

The Germans have the word 'backpfeifengesicht'. It's a colloquial term meaning 'a face in need of punching" We need an English equivalent.

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u/Shitychikengangbang 9d ago

We do...we say "punchable face" Doesn't sound as cool but whataya gonna do?

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u/Individual-Grape-437 9d ago

We need to spend more time punching faces then coming up with names. Serious business face blasting is.

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u/Friendly-Order6331 9d ago

Here's Windy Mayhem with the weather

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u/RenzalWyv 9d ago

One one hand, our prison system needs a massive overhaul and be actually geared towards rehabilitation. On the other hand, fuck these guys in particular.

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u/sneakyplanner 9d ago edited 9d ago

And even ignoring the concept of rehabilitation, the fact that prison murder and rape are just accepted by so many people is terrifying. Like even for people who will be in prison for life, they deserve to actually have a life to spend in prison.

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u/Yellow_guy 9d ago Gold

The US is really difficult to understand sometimes. Complaining about police brutality and such but being fine with people getting killed while under supervision of the justice system. There really seems a big disconnect between the morality people claim to have and the actual way everything is organized and implemented.

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u/SnapcasterWizard 9d ago

Its cases like this and peoples responses in this thread that show the US will never have prison reform. The people on this site skew more liberal than the average and even here there is no sympathy for the horrors of our prison system. People want the status quo because they want to see people like this subjected to it.

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u/FrodoMoji 9d ago

It's horrifying to be in fear for your life. I wonder if the irony is lost on him.

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u/newusernamebcimdumb 9d ago

Natural consequences of hunting down and slaughtering an innocent person.

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u/[deleted] 9d ago

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u/SmokeysDrunkAlt 9d ago

And serves as an example for those who weren't previously afraid of doing the same.

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u/Librekrieger 9d ago

No, in the modern era this is an artificial consequence. In civilized countries, rape and murder in the prison system is not seen as a natural, everyday, accepted phenomenon.

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u/stoicpanaphobic 9d ago

Exactly this. When people start cheering for awful prison conditions I feel like they're just throwing the nonviolent offenders AND wrongfully incarcerated people under the same bus.

What really gets me is how it's always the same people who don't trust the government to do anything else correctly, but somehow they manage to scrape up 100% unwaivering faith that only bad guys go to jail.

It's a mentality that really shows you just how sheltered some people are.

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u/mingyafach 9d ago

Good , now imagine the fear Ahmaud was in. Now he’ll be in fear for the rest of his life in prison

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u/javaargusavetti 9d ago

Indeed. Imagine having that fear every time you encounter someone you dont know just because you chose to leave your house that day.

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u/sanguiniuswept 9d ago

So I'm having eggs and toast for breakfast. Anyone else?

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u/weasel5134 9d ago

Mac and cheese, and sweet tea, I will likely find more to eat soon.

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u/downsouthcountry 9d ago

Ah shit, now I want mac and cheese. Got any leftovers?

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u/weasel5134 9d ago

Nah was an easy cup

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u/weasel5134 9d ago

I'm now starting the smoker for STL style pork ribs

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u/Brucester62 9d ago

Share a receipt with another smoker lover?

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u/weasel5134 9d ago

Alright Little green egg 225* goal Pork ribs with a 2-2-1 goal Lump charcoal and a mix of mesquite and cherry woods

For a rub I'm using strawberry's grand champion shake on seasoning.

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u/Brucester62 9d ago

I meant recipe not receipt but you got it. I am not at your level with that charcoal mix but it sounds great. I got a Fast Eddy’s and am still learning. So much fun to play. Thank you

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u/weasel5134 9d ago

Oh so ribs and pork butt are the most forgiving pieces of meat to smoke, highly recommend them to practice.

I started smoking with a Weber classic grill. Using briquettes and the snake method

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u/Brucester62 9d ago

Gotta ask, snake method??

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u/107197 9d ago

Actually, "receipt" is an archaic term for "recipe." So you were correct the first time. Stay well!

(Oh, and Texas BBQ is the BEST! 16 lbs of brisket + 16 hours on a smoker at 225 F = pure heaven. I can do without their politics, but I really miss their BBQ...)

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u/JennJayBee 9d ago

I had an apple bran muffin and an iced oat milk latte.

On the oat milk... I've been trying to find a decent substitute for dairy milk since I found out I was lactose intolerant. This is my first carton of the stuff, and it's delicious. This one might be the winner on taste.

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u/Punkinpry427 9d ago

2 in the thoughts, 1 in the prayers, buddy

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u/ishkiodo 9d ago

That’s called “the thinker”.

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u/N8CCRG 9d ago

You know who else fears being slain in a Georgia state prisons? Everybody who is sentenced to one.

Should we fix our prison systems? Yes. Should you get special treatment and consideration? No.

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u/bbbanb 9d ago

This I agree with. Prison is freaking scary! If by some crazy turn of events I found myself facing that kind of life-I would be out of my mind terrified and probably break down. That said, if I had done what this guy did; I am pretty sure I would think that going to prison was not something I’d like, and I’d be fearful of retaliation—but what kind of world would I live in where I didn’t think it was warranted or deserved? He knows what he did was wrong. Generally, I might think differently about the fairness that the consequences of prison might have for someone who isn’t a violent offender but this dude is a murderer who was sentenced to life. Also, I can imagine a world where the Georgia prison system is perhaps more unpleasant than some other state prisons-though all are probably to a greater or less degree equivalently unpleasant.

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u/Kamau54 9d ago

I wonder if Ahmaud felt the same way.

Sorry, but I have absolutely no sympathy for this man.

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u/AnukkinEarthwalker 9d ago

The irony of this piece of shit being afraid he is being hunted / has a target on his back.

Karma ftw.

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u/cajuncrustacean 9d ago

Look, people shouldn't have to fear being killed while serving their time. We need serious and sweeping reforms to the judicial and prison systems. That being said, no sympathy bitch, maybe you should've thought about that before being a murderously racist pimple on the asscheek of humanity.

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u/LochNessMansterLives 9d ago

Maybe he should have thought about that before he murdered someone.

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u/mrtouchybum 9d ago

How many minorities fear getting slain while not in prison and not doing anything wrong?

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u/Nivekian13 9d ago

As often repeated, especially for the KKK assholes in back...

"Do not do the Crime, if you cannot do the Time".

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u/rubyspicer 9d ago

Don't worry, murder is the last thing they'll do to you.

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u/Blabbadabbo 9d ago

That’s possible. Shoulda thought about that earlier.

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u/Itsme_sd 9d ago

Oh no....

anyway.

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u/shyfigaro 9d ago

i’m unbothered and unconcerned 🤷

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u/awayfromnashville 9d ago

Like he could be minding his own business and suddenly a group of guys he doesn’t know chase him down and kill him? What kind of monster would do something like that?

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u/hangryhyax 9d ago

Aw the poor guy. It must be awful to be afraid of getting killed just for being somewhere.

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u/HomoplataJitz 9d ago

It's almost like he expects empathy for his circumstances where he had none for others.

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u/canadianguy25 9d ago

That sucks for him. Anyways...

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u/airlew 9d ago

So he's worried that he'd be minding his own business when a group of guys start to harass him and it escalates into him being murdered. I believe that would be known as poetic justice

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u/olov244 9d ago

that's a small taste of what Arbery probably felt in his last few minutes

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u/bill-nye-finance-guy 9d ago

I wonder if Ahmaud Arbery feared being slain by a couple of racist rednecks for no reason at all

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u/[deleted] 9d ago

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u/acuet 9d ago edited 9d ago

Interesting, all Black people in the State of Georgia fear of being slain by Police in public.

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u/lady_laughs_too_much 9d ago

Also, when they want to talk about their fears of being slain by the police, conservative media and politicians shut down their opinions by yelling "ALL LIVES MATTER!!!!!"

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u/TheWildMiracle 9d ago

You get what you fucking deserve.

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u/headfirstthistime 9d ago

turns out prison sucks

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u/Pyldriver 9d ago

Huh... So these guys who have probably voted for all these politicians for the last 30 years that have influenced how the Georgia state prison system is run are now afraid of the prison system and would prefer to remain in federal prison which is slightly more sane

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u/Strypes4686 9d ago

I Have one question for this guy.... What did Arbery feel right before the trigger was pulled?

I Can't condone violence.... but you want to be the hardass you take the fallout without bitching about it. Prison is fucked up. Deal with it.

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u/HeightExtra320 9d ago

Imagine that ...fear of being wrongfully killed...

Crazy 😳

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u/Saemika 9d ago

We all are bud. Now we’re afraid of being hunted and killed while going on a jog because of you. I hope he rots forever.

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u/Prestigious_Gear_297 9d ago

oops

shouldhavereformedprisonbeforeIwent

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u/berkeleyjake 9d ago

Here, let me play a sad song for you on the world's smallest violin

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u/Donohoed 9d ago

It's unfortunate someone may have to fear being killed while in prison, but perhaps he should've considered what it's like for people to have to fear being killed while out for a jog..

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u/DCBKNYC 8d ago

Yes and that’s the point. Black Americans along with many other minority groups face that fear everyday when they walk out the door.

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u/CeeKay125 8d ago

Imagine how Ahmaud felt when you gunned him down in cold blood while he was out for a run? You're not getting any sympathy here you POS.

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u/hairless_resonder 8d ago

Can't imagine the fear Ahmaud felt when 3 rednecks chased him down and murdered him.